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The AVA Annual Conference is the nation’s premier veterinary event, covering all fields of veterinary science and in 2017 brought together over 920 veterinary professionals and 115 exhibitors.

We hope you will join us for the 2018 AVA Annual Conference in Brisbane, 13-18 May.    
Visit conference.ava.com.au to register.    To download a pdf file of the entire program click here.
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Sunday, May 13
 

1:00pm

Australian Small Animal (ASAV) Innovation, Research and Development Symposium
Great Hall, Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

AVA member/SIG member:                       Free of Charge
AVA student/new graduate member:  Free of Charge
Non-member:                                                    $200

We are excited to announce that ASAV will be hosting a pre-conference symposium with 15 minute paper presentations by fellow Veterinarians.

More infomation and the selection criteria

3 VetEd points

Sunday May 13, 2018 1:00pm - 4:00pm
Workshops & Field Trips
 
Monday, May 14
 

8:15am

Allergic disease: diagnosis: cutaneous adverse food reaction ** Note change of time**
** This lecture has been moved forward from 2.30pm **

The diagnosis of cutaneous adverse food reactions in dogs and cats can be challenging. This presentation will provide the practitioner with an update on diagnostic methods and a discussion of the challenges and pitfalls of both home prepared and commercial elimination diets.

Speakers
MB

Mandy Burrows

College of Veterinary Medicine, School of Veterinary and Life Sciences, Murdoch University


Monday May 14, 2018 8:15am - 9:15am
Great Hall Doors 1 and 8 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

8:15am

Equine Cushing’s Disease/PPID – what do we know now?
The importance of equine pituitary pars intermedia dysfunction (PPID or Equine Cushing’s disease) has become better understood in the last decade following some excellent pathophysiological research from the USA and Australian epidemiological research highlighting just how prevalent this disease is. The same group highlighted the disparity between owner recognition of the subtle signs of the condition and the actual prevalence found on blood tests. Although there have been many tests used to diagnose PPID in the past, testing practices are becoming more standardised with a better understanding of which test to use and when. The aims of this presentation are to: 1: Recap the pathophysiology of PPID and evidence for it being a neurodegenerative disorder associated with aging in horses. 2: Discuss the epidemiology of PPID including its prevalence, risk factors, associated clinical signs and clinicopathological abnormalities, particularly laminitis and insulin dysregulation. Also early and more subtle clinical signs that owners may confuse with signs of old age. 3: Review current best practice in diagnosis of PPID including basal and dynamic tests, ways to improve early detection of PPID and the effect of season and making season work for you.

Speakers
avatar for Cathy McGowan

Cathy McGowan

University of Liverpool
Cathy is Professor of Equine Internal Medicine, Head of Department, Equine Clinical Science at The University of Liverpool, Institute of Veterinary Science.Graduating from the University of Sydney (1991) she has aPhD in equine exercise physiology, RCVS and European Diplomas and recognised... Read More →


Monday May 14, 2018 8:15am - 9:15am
Mezzanine M1 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

8:15am

Oral examination
Along with obtaining a good history from clients, performing a safe and thorough conscious oral examination in veterinary patients should be incorporated as part of a standard, full physical examination in both dental and non-dental cases. The findings from a thorough oral exam permit clinicians to generate treatment planning prior to the anesthetized dental procedure, allowing client communication regarding the severity of the dental disease and its prognosis. In addition, clinicians will also be able to estimate the amount of time needed for the dental procedure and plan their surgery day efficiently. A systematic approach to oral examinations that includes both extraoral and intraoral components will be discussed in this presentation. Clinically relevant anatomy of the skull and oral cavity will be reviewed as part of normal findings. Common dental pathology, such as periodontal disease, endodontal disease, and tooth resorption, will also be discussed along with their common presenting clinical signs. Attendees are encouraged to bring a dog/cat skull model (only if available; this is not mandatory) to this presentation.

Speakers
avatar for Williana Basuki

Williana Basuki

Practice Limited to Veterinary Dentistry, Tufts Veterinary Emergency Treatment and Specialties
Dr. Williana Basuki was born and grew up in Indonesia. She earned her veterinary degree at the University of Queensland in 2010. After university, she embarked on her journey as a small animal practitioner before entering a rotating internship followed by a surgery internship at Queensland... Read More →


Monday May 14, 2018 8:15am - 9:15am
Mezzanine M2 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

8:15am

Aggressive dogs: Reading the Signs
Canid body language is often an overlooked indicator of fear and potential for aggression. Canids communicate fears, anxiety and appeasement by body postures which may be appreciated in every day contexts.

Speakers
avatar for Theresa DePorter

Theresa DePorter

Oakland Veterinary Referral Services
Board Certified Veterinary Behaviourist at Oakland Veterinary Referral Services in metropolitan Detroit Michigan USA  Graduated from Purdue in 1992.  Diplomate in both the American College of Veterinary Behaviorists (ACVB) and European College of Animal Welfare and Behavioural Medicine... Read More →


Monday May 14, 2018 8:15am - 9:15am
Mezzanine M3 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

8:15am

Making your health care messages consistent, engaging the team in clear messages. Yes you need to be clearer
In this session we'll explore the importance of everyone sharing the same message with clients, from the reception desk to the consult room or yard. We'll look at a 7-step process that will help you structure all client communications to remove confusion and ensure consistency. Simple, but effective, steps such as displaying prices clearly throughout the practice, ensuring new starters receive induction training in 'how we do things' and training the practice team together regularly, will all help the team speak with one voice. A voice that the client will hear loud and clear.

Speakers
avatar for Alison Lambert

Alison Lambert

Managing Director, On Switch
A farmer's daughter from Yorkshire, Alison qualified from Liverpool University in 1989. She worked in practice for several years before pursuing a business career with Hills Pet Nutrition and MARS, where she discovered the passion for the customer experience that her award-winning... Read More →


Monday May 14, 2018 8:15am - 9:15am
Mezzanine M4 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

8:15am

Antimicrobial Resistance: Ongoing challenges and opportunities
Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is recognised as a serious, long-term threat to human and animal health that also has major economic consequences. Since 2001, there have been concerted international efforts towards a unified approach to the management of AMR. As a result, the human and animal health sectors around the globe have directed significant resources to protect against the harmful effects of AMR, and to raise awareness in their communities. In Australia, there has been a substantial collaborative effort to address AMR at the national level. Since 2015, the National Antimicrobial Resistance Strategy 2015–2019 has brought together diverse groups from the human health, animal health and agri-food sectors. The first National Progress Report on the Implementation Plan for the National AMR Strategy 2015–2019 was released in November 2017, demonstrating our achievements and identifying current and future work. Given the complexity of the issue , continued and strengthened national One Health partnerships amongst the animal, human and environment health sectors, and at regional and international levels, are essential. The Australian veterinary and animal health sector plays a key role in addressing AMR to ensure ongoing access to antimicrobials for veterinary use and ongoing export market access.

Speakers
avatar for Mark Schipp

Mark Schipp

Chief Veterinary Officer, Australian Government Department of Agriculture and Water Resources
Mark Schipp was appointed Australian Chief Veterinary Officer in 2011. In 2012 he was elected to the OIE Council and in 2015 was elected Vice President of the OIE General Assembly. He is chair of Wildlife Health Australia management committee and chair of Animal Health Committee... Read More →


Monday May 14, 2018 8:15am - 9:15am
Plaza P1 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

8:15am

Do animals experience happiness and why does it matter? Research into positive emotions
Until recently animal welfare assessment traditionally relied on measures of physical health, and changes in behaviour and physiology related to negative emotional states such as pain and stress. However, it is now widely accepted that good welfare is not simply the absence of disease or negative experiences, but also the presence of positive experiences such as pleasure. Understanding what good welfare is, how welfare can be assessed across a range of environments and uses, and what needs to be done to achieve higher welfare, is considered to be a key priority for ensuring the welfare of animals in their interactions with humans. In order to achieve this, we need to be able to develop reliable methods for recognising and assessing positive emotional states and develop a framework for enabling robust judgements to be made.

Speakers
avatar for Nat Waran

Nat Waran

Executive Dean and Professor (One Welfare), Eastern Institute of Technology, Te Aho a Māui
Nat gained a first class Zoology degree from Glasgow University, and PhD from Cambridge University’s Veterinary School funded by the British Veterinary Association. She joined Edinburgh University in 1990 to develop a unique PG Masters in the relatively new area of Applied Animal... Read More →


Monday May 14, 2018 8:15am - 9:15am
Plaza P2 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

8:15am

Fostering Mental Health and Wellbeing in the Veterinary Profession
Speakers
NB

Naomi Bickley

Clinical Psychologist, Naomi Bickley Clinical Psychologist


Monday May 14, 2018 8:15am - 10:15am
Plaza P3 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

9:15am

Immune suppressive drugs: do we need more than prednisolone?
Prednisolone is a very effective immune suppressive drug, with rapid onset of action at an attractive price. However, the effect of corticosteroids is not specific to the immune system and for this reason several adverse effects can be seen. This is especially an important consideration when treating diseases for which immune suppression is expected to be needed for several months to achieve a durable clinical response. For this reason, several other immune suppressive drugs have been used commonly in conjunction with steroids such as azathioprine, cyclosporine, and chlorambucil as steroid sparing drugs. Chlorambucil and cyclosporine can also be used as sole agent in animals where prednisolone is contra-indicated: for example, to treat a cat that has developed diabetes while treated with steroids. We will review what evidence is available to use of these drugs in different diseases and get more familiar with newer immune suppressive drugs such as mycophenolate and leflunomide. At the end of this discussion, you should feel comfortable to use these drugs in your busy every day caseload.

Speakers
JD

Julien Dandrieux

Univeristy of Melbourne
Julien graduated in 2002 from the University of Bern in Switzerland. He did a rotating internship in the same institution, followed by his medicine residency, which was a joint program between the University of Bern and Louisiana State University. Julien then worked as a clinician... Read More →


Monday May 14, 2018 9:15am - 10:15am
Great Hall Doors 1 and 8 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

9:15am

Getting the old guys back on track: Management of PPID
With the licensing and marketing of pergolide (Prascend) medical treatment for equine pituitary pars intermedia dysfunction (PPID or Equine Cushing’s disease) has become more common. Unlike the case a decade ago where conservative management was sometimes still advocated, medical treatment of PPID is now the accepted ‘norm’ and owners should be fully informed about the treatment options. However, medical treatment is just the first step and the key to success in these old guys is monitoring and follow-up. This needs to be done in the context of geriatric horse health and welfare, but if well managed, these cases and their owners are an important part of equine practices. The aims of this presentation are to: 1. Outline the treatment of PPID and how it works, including side effects and dose adjustment and prognosis. 2. Outline the benefits and method for monitoring PPID cases on treatment with endocrinological testing and owner participation in monitoring clinical signs. 3. Discuss how to manage the difficult case, including cases with concurrent diseases associated with older age, concurrent equine metabolic syndrome or laminitis and nutritional management.

Speakers
avatar for Cathy McGowan

Cathy McGowan

University of Liverpool
Cathy is Professor of Equine Internal Medicine, Head of Department, Equine Clinical Science at The University of Liverpool, Institute of Veterinary Science.Graduating from the University of Sydney (1991) she has aPhD in equine exercise physiology, RCVS and European Diplomas and recognised... Read More →


Monday May 14, 2018 9:15am - 10:15am
Mezzanine M1 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

9:15am

Intraoral radiographs – technique and interpretation
There are a growing number of small animal veterinary practices in Australia that own and perform dental radiographs as part of their routine dental procedures. Dental radiographs aid clinicians in diagnosing dental disease more accurately and allows clinicians to assess some of the anatomical structures that” are not apparent to the eye, such as tooth roots. In addition, dental radiographs are extremely invaluable for clinicians in post-operative evaluation, allowing for effective client communication and serving as a legal document. Performing dental radiographs can be technically challenging due to unique skull structures and limited space in the oral cavity. This presentation is aimed at describing the commonly used techniques in performing intraoral and extraoral radiographs that are pertinent to canine and feline dentistry such as the bisecting angle technique. Interpretation of dental radiographs that includes normal anatomical findings and common pathological changes will also be thoroughly discussed. Attendees are encouraged to bring a dog/cat skull model (only if available; this is not mandatory) to this presentation.

Speakers
avatar for Williana Basuki

Williana Basuki

Practice Limited to Veterinary Dentistry, Tufts Veterinary Emergency Treatment and Specialties
Dr. Williana Basuki was born and grew up in Indonesia. She earned her veterinary degree at the University of Queensland in 2010. After university, she embarked on her journey as a small animal practitioner before entering a rotating internship followed by a surgery internship at Queensland... Read More →


Monday May 14, 2018 9:15am - 10:15am
Mezzanine M2 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

9:15am

Aggressive dogs at the Veterinary Hospital
Strategies to mitigate and reduce the risk of aggression to staff members while addressing the dog’s distress. Dogs may bite the hand that treats them. Safe strategies to alleviate the dogs distress while incorporating Fear FreeTM Strategies into the veterinary practice.

Speakers
avatar for Theresa DePorter

Theresa DePorter

Oakland Veterinary Referral Services
Board Certified Veterinary Behaviourist at Oakland Veterinary Referral Services in metropolitan Detroit Michigan USA  Graduated from Purdue in 1992.  Diplomate in both the American College of Veterinary Behaviorists (ACVB) and European College of Animal Welfare and Behavioural Medicine... Read More →


Monday May 14, 2018 9:15am - 10:15am
Mezzanine M3 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

9:15am

Creating a values-based culture ….how to get to your values and how to make them mean something
In this session we'll look at the key role that your practice values play in attracting and retaining clients. Defining who you are and how you do things differently is crucial if owners and smallholders are to choose you over the competition. Aligning these values with real consumer needs is even better. Understanding your catchment area and target demographic will help you ensure that your values match those of your clients, and we'll look at simple ways to find and use these vital inisghts. Involve the whole team in defining your values, embed them into everyone's job description and appraise the team against delivery of them. Living your values benefits everyone and drives footfall, which ultimately positively impacts on the bottom line.

Speakers
avatar for Alison Lambert

Alison Lambert

Managing Director, On Switch
A farmer's daughter from Yorkshire, Alison qualified from Liverpool University in 1989. She worked in practice for several years before pursuing a business career with Hills Pet Nutrition and MARS, where she discovered the passion for the customer experience that her award-winning... Read More →


Monday May 14, 2018 9:15am - 10:15am
Mezzanine M4 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

9:15am

Calculating appropriate withholding periods for off-label use of drugs
Speakers
avatar for Dr Ted Whittem

Dr Ted Whittem

Professor of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, University of Melbourne
Dr Whittem is Professor and Chair of Veterinary Clinical Sciences at the University of Melbourne's School of Veterinary Medicine. Since the mid-1990s Dr Whittem has been an active researcher in veterinary clinical pharmacology especially using pharmacokinetics, with a focused interest... Read More →


Monday May 14, 2018 9:15am - 10:15am
Plaza P1 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre
  • Stream Cattle, Public Health
  • about Dr Whittem is Professor and Chair of Veterinary Clinical Sciences at the University of Melbourne's School of Veterinary Medicine. Since the mid-1990s Dr Whittem has been an active researcher in veterinary clinical pharmacology especially using pharmacokinetics, with a focused interest in the application of novel methods of for description of the pharmacokinetics of animal populations. Recently he has applied this interest in particular to develop a physiologically-based population pharmacokinetic model of the bovine udder for intramammary antibiotics, to help understand the factors that affect both their efficacy and the occurrence of violative drug residues in food.<br>

9:15am

The companion animal conundrum: Different values lead to different welfare challenges
Unrealistic expectations, conflicts and intolerances of humans towards animals often lead to welfare issues for both and this is well illustrated in the case of companion animals. With increasing numbers of dogs and cats living in close proximity with humans, there are always concerns regarding injury to the public, as well as the spread of zoonotic diseases such as toxoplasmosis and rabies. In addition to such health issues for humans, are rising concerns about the physical and psychological health of individual animals. In this presentation I will explore the conflicts and challenges related to the human - companion interaction in different parts of the world, and the role that Science can play in helping to address inconsistencies in practice.

Speakers
avatar for Nat Waran

Nat Waran

Executive Dean and Professor (One Welfare), Eastern Institute of Technology, Te Aho a Māui
Nat gained a first class Zoology degree from Glasgow University, and PhD from Cambridge University’s Veterinary School funded by the British Veterinary Association. She joined Edinburgh University in 1990 to develop a unique PG Masters in the relatively new area of Applied Animal... Read More →


Monday May 14, 2018 9:15am - 10:15am
Plaza P2 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

10:45am

Plenary - The boundaries between human and technological evolution and intelligent technologies
With today’s staggering advances in technology, many new possibilities are emerging which almost seem to have come straight out of the realms of sci-fi fantasy. When we connect some of the dots between various cutting-edge fields, the innovations become even more intriguing.
 
In this presentation, Biomedical engineer Dr Jordan Nguyen will raise an incredibly interesting and perhaps confronting conversation around links drawn between the fields of artificial intelligence, virtual reality, new techniques in 3D human scanning, neuroscience, and the ideas of human consciousness.
 
This topic raises a number of questions about what it is to be human and what is a moral approach to the incredible things we can achieve today with the latest advancements in technology – advancements that are increasingly blurring the lines between the virtual world and the real world.

Speakers
avatar for Jordan Nguyen

Jordan Nguyen

Dr Jordan Nguyen is on a mission to improve the lives of as many people as possible. By re-imagining and re-defining the boundaries between human and technological evolution, Jordan is at the forefront of bringing about positive, sustainable and life-altering change.An internationally... Read More →


Monday May 14, 2018 10:45am - 12:15pm
Great Hall Doors 1 and 8 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

1:30pm

Implementing new post-mortem inspection procedures and disposition judgements
Traditional meat inspection procedures date back to the late 19th and early 20th Century and were designed to control important zoonotic diseases that were relatively prevalent in Europe and North America. Gross abnormalities of such diseases were detected using organoleptic techniques. Over the last 50 years or so, animal health and hygiene practices have continued to improve and traditional inspection procedures may not be suitable for contemporary meat inspection in the 21st Century. Currently both the red meat and pork industries have research projects underway with the overarching objective to demonstrate that alternative inspection procedures and disposition judgements can be implemented to deliver equivalent or better food safety outcomes compared with current procedures prescribed in the Australian Meat Standard. The Department of Agriculture and Water Resources (the department) is the competent authority for the export meat sector and it is involved in a collaborative project with Australian Pork Limited (APL) and the Australian Meat Industry Council (AMIC) to develop a national implementation procedure for the introduction of new post-mortem inspection and disposition judgements.

Speakers
SA

Samantha Allan

National Veterinary Technical Manager, Department of Ag, Canberra
Dr Sam Allan currently is the National Veterinary Technical Manager within the Meat Export Program of the Department of Agriculture and Water Resources. She has worked in the department since 2008 and has had various national operational roles including Area Technical Manager and... Read More →


Monday May 14, 2018 1:30pm - 2:00pm
Plaza P3 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

1:30pm

Allergy: Diagnosis: atopic disease versus contact allergy
In clinical veterinary practice atopic dermatitis and contact allergic skin disease are common. It can be challenging to discriminate between these conditions, especially in the dog. This presentation will review the value of intradermal and serologic testing for atopic dermatitis in the dog and cat and the role of scratch/patch testing for contact allergic skin disease in the dog.

Speakers
MB

Mandy Burrows

College of Veterinary Medicine, School of Veterinary and Life Sciences, Murdoch University


Monday May 14, 2018 1:30pm - 2:30pm
Great Hall Doors 1 and 8 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

1:30pm

2 types of ponies
Knowledge of feedstuff starch and sugar level is fundamental to prevention of laminitis, IR, EMS, DOD and tying-up. Management of insulin resistance is all about diet and exercise. Feeds that cause the largest changes in blood glucose are those with the largest NSC values, so low-NSC feeds should be selected for horses with health issues related to blood glucose changes. Muscle mass, weanling and yearling growth and fat reduction are affected by the glycaemic index and the amino acid composition of the feed. Weight loss through feed restriction and/or exercise improves insulin sensitivity. Weight loss should be 0.5–1% of body weight per week and the effectiveness monitored regularly either by weighing or measuring body or girth circumference — aiming for a reduction of 1 to 2 cm per week. Insulin resistance accompanies late pregnancy and ensures blood glucose remains high to supply the fetal foal. This pregnancy-induced insulin resistance, may not be a problem in a normal mare but a mare that starts her pregnancy with insulin resistance can get into trouble.

Speakers

Monday May 14, 2018 1:30pm - 2:30pm
Mezzanine M1 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

1:30pm

Simple and surgical tooth extractions
Tooth extractions in cats and dogs are surgical procedures. They involve careful treatment planning including taking preoperative radiographs to ascertain root curvature, concurrent bony or root abnormalities or pathology, supernumerary roots in multi-rooted teeth and the closeness of the roots to important anatomical structures. The correct use of hand and motor driven instrumentation is essential for performing successful tooth extractions. Extractions can be time consuming, frustrating and should not be entered into lightly. Misadventure or complications are common place when attempting tooth extractions. This lecture will look at the instrumentation currently available including a look at new mechanical periotomes. The lecture will also discuss the steps that are carried out to perform stress free tooth extractions whilst minimising any potential risks.

Speakers
avatar for Tony Caiafa

Tony Caiafa

Veterinary Dentist, The Smile Centre
Graduated University of Melbourne BVSc 1978 Graduated Dux of class University of melbourne BDSc 1998 MANCVS Small animal surgery, Small animal dentistry and oral surgery Lectured, authored many times in the field of Veterinary dentistry both within Australia and worldwide. Currently... Read More →


Monday May 14, 2018 1:30pm - 2:30pm
Mezzanine M2 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

1:30pm

A Tale of Two Tails: Causes of Tail Chasing
Tail chasing often ends in amputation and frustration. There are many causes of tail chasing. Two cases are contrasted and differences in presentation and development history are highlighted to help you with diagnosis and treatment (and hopefully avoid amputation of the tail!).

Speakers
JL

Jacqui Ley

VBSA/MVSC
Registered Specialist in Veterinary Behavioural Medicine. Owner of Veterinary Behaviour Services Australia and sees cases at the Melbourne Veterinary Specialist Centre in Melbourne. Interest in the mental health of all species and the diagnosis and treatment of mental health diso... Read More →


Monday May 14, 2018 1:30pm - 2:30pm
Mezzanine M3 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

1:30pm

Living the dream
Values of education and communication for happy healthy veterinary staff

Speakers

Monday May 14, 2018 1:30pm - 2:30pm
Mezzanine M4 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

1:30pm

Calving/lambing tips and tricks
Treating dystocia is one of the most common emergency callouts for mixed practice veterinarians. With the increase in numbers of city people buying small rural holdings, veterinarians in large towns or on the edge of a city should expect more dystocia cases. In these situations, the facilities are often poor and the owner has limited production animal experience. This talk is aimed at recent graduates wanting to improve their knowledge or veterinarians who want to brush up on their production animal skills in this area. Topics such as ensuring a safe working environment, when to intervene, diagnosing various presentations of the foetus and tools to successfully treat dystocia will be discussed. A summary of basic equipment required will be given and the talk will conclude with best practice in newborn care. This will include immediate emergency newborn care, recognising common congenital defects and the importance of colostrum in preventing perinatal morbidity and mortality.

Speakers
LB

Liz Bramley

Cooinda Vet Hospital


Monday May 14, 2018 1:30pm - 2:30pm
Plaza P1 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

1:30pm

What can be done to make kangaroo harvesting more humane?
For over 50 years, kangaroos have been harvested commercially in Australia for their meat and skin and the practice is often the subject of much controversy. However, the animal welfare implications—particularly the impacts on dependent young—have not been extensively studied. In this presentation, I will give an overview of my research to investigate the effects of harvesting on kangaroo young and ways to potentially reduce animal suffering. I used a multidisciplinary approach—that included aspects of animal behaviour, physiology and human social psychology—to evaluate euthanasia methods for pouch young; determine the short-term impacts of maternal separation on young-at-foot; study the attitudes and behaviour of kangaroo harvesters; and understand the Australian publics’ perceptions of kangaroo management. I will discuss how the results from this research can be used to directly improve the humaneness of current kangaroo harvesting practices and guide communication with the public about the animal welfare impacts of harvesting and other forms of management.

Speakers

Monday May 14, 2018 1:30pm - 2:30pm
Plaza P2 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

2:00pm

Public Health, Biosecurity and Exports  –  Government Veterinarians’ Role
Government veterinarians have always played a vital role in Australia’s agricultural industry. More so than ever before the roles veterinarians play have expanded and will continue to expand into the future. The Commonwealth Department of Agriculture and Water Resources employs more than 300 veterinarians nationally. The roles veterinarians have in the department range from policy making and management to field roles such as performing verification in export abattoirs or dealing with biosecurity issues at airports. Veterinarians have a unique position in this type of workplace as they not only have technical proficiency in the areas of animal health, disease and welfare but also have the skills being demanded by the future of work. These skills include independent judgment and decision making, problem solving and critical thinking, negotiation ability, empathy, and personal drive. These are the skills necessary for the sustainable future of government departments especially as the global shift in technology escalates.

Speakers
DB

Donna Bennett

Principal Veterinary Officer (NT, QLD, NSW), Department of Agriculture and Water Resources
Donna began her career in small animal private practice after graduating from the University of Queensland in 1983. Her career has also included management roles within a multi-national pet food company; a surgical internship at the Murdoch University Veterinary School and a Human... Read More →


Monday May 14, 2018 2:00pm - 2:30pm
Plaza P3 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

2:30pm

Modelling who infected whom in outbreaks
A number of transmission network models have recently been published that combine genomic and epidemiological data to model who infected whom in outbreaks. This research evaluates these models for their usefulness in reliably informing decision-making in future foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) outbreaks on the basis that they must be capable of producing accurate robust predictions within short timeframes based on the sparse data available early in such outbreaks. First, a formal comparison was made of the performance of several published transmission network models based on a set of simulated FMD outbreaks seeded in Victoria with the Australian Animal Disease (AADIS) hybrid model together with phylogenomic simulators. Then, the best-performing of the evaluated models were implemented on real data from the 2010 outbreak of FMD in Miyazaki Prefecture in Japan. The findings from this study point to which models might reliably be used to reconstruct future FMD outbreaks and how to interpret the outputs to inform control. Further ongoing research involves extending the models to explicitly represent a more complete range of farm-type variables and within-animal diversity so they can handle next generation sequencing data.

Speakers
SF

Simon Firestone

University of Melbourne
Simon Firestone is a lecturer in Veterinary Epidemiology and Public Health at the University of Melbourne. He graduated from Veterinary Science at Melbourne in 2000, worked for four years in mixed and small animal practice, then trained as a public health epidemiologist developing... Read More →


Monday May 14, 2018 2:30pm - 3:00pm
Plaza P3 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

2:30pm

Approach to IMHA in the Dog and Cat **Note change of time **
Diagnostic approach to IMHA in the dog and cat, with an emphasis on a practical clinical approach and interpretation of readily available clinical and diagnostic tools such as signalment, physical examination, complete blood count, blood smears, slide agglutination, Coombs testing, and screening tests for underlying disease.

Speakers
avatar for Andrew Mackin

Andrew Mackin

Head, Department of Clinical Sciences, Mississippi State University
Andrew Mackin is Professor and Head of the Department of Clinical Sciences at the Mississippi State University College of Veterinary Medicine. After graduating from Murdoch University he completed an internship and residency in small animal medicine at the University of Melbourne... Read More →


Monday May 14, 2018 2:30pm - 3:30pm
Great Hall Doors 1 and 8 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

2:30pm

Feeding Healthy Older Horses
Speakers

Monday May 14, 2018 2:30pm - 3:30pm
Mezzanine M1 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

2:30pm

Fundamentals of endodontic disease
Disease of the pulp is sadly often overlooked and underdiagnosed in clinical practice. Even when the patient is under general anaesthesia, complicated crown fractures involving the pulp can be missed during an oral examination. Pulpal disease can cause pain, local or facial swelling, lethargy, pyrexia and a decrease in quality of life in our pet population. This lecture will look at the diagnosis of pulpal disease including the use of the essential diagnostic tools that assist in making a diagnosis and formulating a treatment plan. The lecture will also offer an introduction to pulpal therapy including vital pulp therapy (pulpotomy) and conventional root canal treatment. A discussion of the instrumentation required and the steps involved in performing successful pulp therapy will follow.

Speakers
avatar for Tony Caiafa

Tony Caiafa

Veterinary Dentist, The Smile Centre
Graduated University of Melbourne BVSc 1978 Graduated Dux of class University of melbourne BDSc 1998 MANCVS Small animal surgery, Small animal dentistry and oral surgery Lectured, authored many times in the field of Veterinary dentistry both within Australia and worldwide. Currently... Read More →


Monday May 14, 2018 2:30pm - 3:30pm
Mezzanine M2 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

2:30pm

Panel Discussion: State of the Market
Psychotropic medications are a mystery to many. The selection of medication for treatment of behaviour cases relies on clinical experience as much as science. Drs Theresa de Porter, Kersti Seksel and Jacqui Ley, experienced, internationally qualified specialists in Veterinary Behavioural Medicine discuss and answer questions about medication use in their cases.

Speakers
avatar for Theresa DePorter

Theresa DePorter

Oakland Veterinary Referral Services
Board Certified Veterinary Behaviourist at Oakland Veterinary Referral Services in metropolitan Detroit Michigan USA  Graduated from Purdue in 1992.  Diplomate in both the American College of Veterinary Behaviorists (ACVB) and European College of Animal Welfare and Behavioural Medicine... Read More →
JL

Jacqui Ley

VBSA/MVSC
Registered Specialist in Veterinary Behavioural Medicine. Owner of Veterinary Behaviour Services Australia and sees cases at the Melbourne Veterinary Specialist Centre in Melbourne. Interest in the mental health of all species and the diagnosis and treatment of mental health diso... Read More →
KS

Kersti Seksel

Sydney Animal Behaviour Service
After graduating from Sydney University as a veterinarian Kersti completed a BA in Behavioural Sciences and a MA (Hons). She is a Fellow of the Australian and New Zealand College of Veterinary Scientists, a Diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Behaviorists and a Diplomate... Read More →


Monday May 14, 2018 2:30pm - 3:30pm
Mezzanine M4 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

2:30pm

Cattle nutrition 101
Ruminant nutrition is one area that many mixed practice veterinarians do not feel confident advising on. However there is a trend for people from the city to buy lifestyle small rural holdings and run a small herd of cows with very little or no previous production animal knowledge. One of the common problems is that owners greatly underestimate how much a cow needs to eat to maintain weight, particularly in the winter. They also have no understanding of quality of feed and whether it contains enough energy, protein and fibre. These problems can lead to a number of metabolic diseases such as ketosis, hypocalcaemia and acidosis. The aim of this presentation is to provide veterinarians with some basic knowledge on cattle nutrition so that they can recognise possible nutritional causes to metabolic diseases and deaths that they may be presented with. Maintenance requirements for classes of stock will be discussed. The energy, protein and fibre requirements for cattle will be matched with what some of the common feeds contain and high risk diets such as feeding bread and other by-products will also be summarised.

Speakers
LB

Liz Bramley

Cooinda Vet Hospital


Monday May 14, 2018 2:30pm - 3:30pm
Plaza P1 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

2:30pm

Kangaroos can be assets rather than pests
Current kangaroo management could be much improved. Most of Australia's 40m plus kangaroos continue to be regarded by the landholders on whose properties they occur as pests that compete with livestock, rather than as assets. The kangaroo harvesting industry is currently declining and is ineffective in managing populations, largely due to animal rights campaigns. In recent years less than half the annual quota has been taken. Consequently, graziers are erecting kangaroo-proof fences around groups of properties and lowering numbers through various other means. Most have poor animal welfare and biodiversity outcomes. If kangaroos were as valuable as goats or deer, landholders would have an incentive to co-produce kangaroos alongside conventional livestock and take advantage of kangaroo’s adaptations. Doing so could help address the falling sustainability of many rangeland production systems. Governments currently set harvesting quotas as a proportion of existing (variable) populations. An alternative would be to set population targets based on total grazing pressure that takes account of densities of other herbivores.

Speakers
GW

George Wilson

ANU Honorary Professor, Australian National University
George Wilson began his interest in kangaroo management in 1970 with the NSW National Parks and Wildlife Service. Today as an ANU Honorary Professor, he has a continuing interest in population ecology, threatened species management, wildlife industries, tourism and support for Indigenous... Read More →


Monday May 14, 2018 2:30pm - 3:30pm
Plaza P2 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

3:00pm

Ross River virus forecasting
Ross River virus (RRV) is Victoria’s most commonly reported zoonotic arbovirus. The Victorian Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) worked with modellers to refine an established RRV predictive model for Mildura local government area (LGA) and develop models for another three rural Victorian LGAs. Data from July 2005–June 2012 obtained from multiple sources, including DHHS and the Bureau of Meteorology, were used to train negative binomial regression models of monthly RRV case notifications for each LGA. Data from July 2012–June 2017 were used for model validation. Validated models included variables relating to surface water (precipitation, evapotranspiration, Murray river flows and humidity) and the El Niño cycle. An interactive application to report model results was developed and is being piloted during the 2017/18 arbovirus season as part of DHHS’ integrated arbovirus surveillance system. Models were similar despite differences in climate and RRV epidemiology across the four LGAs, lending support for expansion to additional LGAs.

Speakers
KG

Katherine Gibney

University of Melbourne, Doherty Institute


Monday May 14, 2018 3:00pm - 3:30pm
Plaza P3 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre
 
Tuesday, May 15
 

8:00am

The national security implications of biological warfare against animals
Whilst there have been many incidents where state actors (military personnel and intelligence operatives) or non-state actors (activists, insurgents, terrorists and criminals) have attempted or used biological weapons against animals, they are rarely examined in detail. This presentation will examine a number of these incidents including Imperial Germany’s global sabotage campaign against horses during the First World War, Operation Vegetarian, a British plan to retaliate against German cattle herds during the Second World War and the unauthorised release of rabbit haemorrhagic disease virus in New Zealand in 1997. The potential national security implications for Australia of these and other incidents will be considered as well as the role of veterinarians in attributing the cause of an incident and inform any subsequent government response.

Speakers

Tuesday May 15, 2018 8:00am - 8:30am
Mezzanine M2 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

8:00am

The role of professional societies in the education of veterinary students and graduates: Australian Society for Parasitology
Parasitic diseases are responsible for the largest financial impact on Australian farms productivity, but how competent are our new graduates to address this issue? In this presentation we summarise the major challenges in the teaching of veterinary parasitology based on experience across multiple contexts and universities and outline emerging opportunities for veterinary parasitologists and educators to work together. We will demonstrate how a cross university portal can serve parasitology education. Promoting the advancement of knowledge has been a key objective of the Australian Society for Parasitology (ASP) since its foundation in 1964. ASP initiatives that support the education of graduates include travel awards and prizes for outstanding achievement, financial support to bring international experts to Australia and a major investment in the parasitology textbook “Australasian Animal Parasites Inside and Out”. We will outline the role ASP’s Education Committee plays in the Society’s contribution to the community.

Speakers

Tuesday May 15, 2018 8:00am - 8:30am
Plaza P2 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

8:00am

Guinea pig dermatology
Speakers
avatar for Bob Doneley

Bob Doneley

UPAV Committee, UQ Veterinary Medical Centre
Bob Doneley graduated from the University of Queensland in 1982. After working as an associate in veterinary practices in Bundaberg, Brisbane, the UK, and Toowoomba, he opened the West Toowoomba Vet Surgery in 1988. Bob sold the practice in August 2010, initially to take up the position... Read More →


Tuesday May 15, 2018 8:00am - 8:30am
Plaza P3 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

8:00am

Approach to IMT in the Dog and Cat
Diagnostic approach to IMT in the dog and cat, with an emphasis on typical clinical presentation, a practical clinical approach and interpretation of readily available clinical and diagnostic tools such as signalment, physical examination, complete blood count, blood smears, hemostatic testing, recognition of artefacts and screening for underlying disease.

Speakers
avatar for Andrew Mackin

Andrew Mackin

Head, Department of Clinical Sciences, Mississippi State University
Andrew Mackin is Professor and Head of the Department of Clinical Sciences at the Mississippi State University College of Veterinary Medicine. After graduating from Murdoch University he completed an internship and residency in small animal medicine at the University of Melbourne... Read More →


Tuesday May 15, 2018 8:00am - 9:00am
Great Hall Doors 1 and 8 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

8:00am

Pain Management in horses : beyond NSAIDs
Speakers

Tuesday May 15, 2018 8:00am - 9:00am
Mezzanine M1 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

8:00am

Fighting felines: why cats fight and how to help them
Cats that don’t get along are at risk for relinquishment. Understanding the complexities of feline social interactions and strategies for peaceful resolution of kitty controversies is key to implementing strategies for managing and reducing aggression between housemate cats.

Speakers
avatar for Theresa DePorter

Theresa DePorter

Oakland Veterinary Referral Services
Board Certified Veterinary Behaviourist at Oakland Veterinary Referral Services in metropolitan Detroit Michigan USA  Graduated from Purdue in 1992.  Diplomate in both the American College of Veterinary Behaviorists (ACVB) and European College of Animal Welfare and Behavioural Medicine... Read More →


Tuesday May 15, 2018 8:00am - 9:00am
Mezzanine M3 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

8:00am

Team member engagement ,why they stay and why they go
Gallup research has quantified the massive impact employee engagement has on attendance, productivity, profitability and accident rates. Engaged people are motivated by the values of the business and work together to deliver great things. Engagement isn't delivered through generous salaries and benefit schemes, it comes when people feel respected and listened to, when they can see that they are supported by managers and colleagues and feel inspired to push for excellence. Recruitment is time consuming and costly, so it makes sound business sense to invest the required effort in keeping the good people you already have. In this session we'll look at data both from within the veterinary sector and beyond, identifying what workers want from their colleagues and employers and discussing ways to deliver them in your practice.

Speakers
avatar for Alison Lambert

Alison Lambert

Managing Director, On Switch
A farmer's daughter from Yorkshire, Alison qualified from Liverpool University in 1989. She worked in practice for several years before pursuing a business career with Hills Pet Nutrition and MARS, where she discovered the passion for the customer experience that her award-winning... Read More →


Tuesday May 15, 2018 8:00am - 9:00am
Mezzanine M4 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

8:00am

Cattle Medicine - The clinical exam
A complete clinical examination of a sick cow includes describing/identifying the animal, obtaining a history, examining its environment, observation of the animal from a distance, undertaking a general physical examination of all body regions and systems and, if necessary, the selective use of laboratory examinations and special diagnostic tests. Physical and observational examination are the key processes in examination of cattle – noting that the cost of laboratory diagnoses is such that they should be used on a confirmatory, rather than exploratory, basis. Cattle must be restrained (occasionally sedated) for clinical examination. Cattle are mostly used to being handled from the tail end, so the examination usually starts there. Three of the cardinal signs (T, P, R), and abdominal contour, urine and the udder are assessed from the rear, then the fourth cardinal sign (rumen rate) is assessed as the examination proceeds up the LHS of the animal. Abdomen and thorax are usually examined before the head, since examination of the head usually causes the animal some distress. The examination usually concludes with palpation of the abdominal viscera per rectum. In the management of herd problems, euthanasia and necropsy of moribund individuals is often of great value in making a diagnosis.

Speakers
avatar for Tim Parkinson

Tim Parkinson

Tim Parkinson is Professor of Farm Animal Reproduction & Health at Massey University, New Zealand. He graduated from Bristol University and initially worked in cattle practice and cattle AI in the UK. After his PhD in reproductive physiology at Nottingham University, he lectured in... Read More →


Tuesday May 15, 2018 8:00am - 9:00am
Plaza P1 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

8:30am

Managing the risk of human exposures to ABLV
This presentation aims to provide veterinarians with knowledge and approaches they can use to minimise the risk of death due to Australian bat lyssavirus (ABLV) to themselves, their staff, clients and their pets. ABLV is a rabies-like virus endemic in Australian bats that has spilled-over to cause an invariably fatal encephalitis in humans (n=3) and horses (n=2). Due to the similarities with rabies virus, it is assumed that any adequately exposed mammal would develop clinical disease and would pose a risk of secondary transmission to humans and others. While ABLV is present in less than 1% of all free-living bats; it is more common (5-10%) in the sick, injured or orphaned bats that bat carers, veterinarians, and pets are more likely to come into contact with. A pet, typically a dog or cat, that is known or suspected to have had contact with a bat may have been infected with ABLV – and is at risk of developing fatal clinical disease and of transmitting ABLV to others. Selection of the most appropriate actions for a potentially exposed pet should be made on a case-by-case basis. Veterinarians need to be able to assess ABLV risk and provide information that allows owners to make informed decisions about the most appropriate options for their circumstances. Risk mitigation options include: pre-exposure vaccination, avoiding being bitten or scratched by a bat, determining whether exposure to ABLV has occurred by testing the bat or observing the bat for 10 days, post-exposure vaccination, euthanasia of the pet and/or monitoring and reporting onset of clinical disease in animals. Only rabies-vaccinated people who are experienced in handling bats and wearing appropriate personal protective equipment should rescue or examine a bat or other animal suspected of ABLV infection. If potentially exposed to ABLV via a bite or scratch - immediately wash the wound and seek urgent medical advice.

Speakers
avatar for Janine Barrett

Janine Barrett

Principal Veterinary Scientist, Biosecurity Queensland
Janine is a Principal Veterinary Scientist (Surveillance) with Biosecurity Queensland and has been involved in policy development for a number of significant zoonotic diseases including Hendra virus, Australian bat lyssavirus and rabies. She did her PhD on Australian Bat lyssavirus... Read More →


Tuesday May 15, 2018 8:30am - 9:00am
Mezzanine M2 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

8:30am

The demise of the didactic lecture? Staff and student perspectives
Declining physical attendance at lectures by students is an emerging trend experienced by many higher education institutions. Contributing factors related to this trend may be changes in student demographics, learning needs and strategies, and the use of lecture recording technology that has become mandatory for many institutions in recent years. This study aimed to explore the range of factors that influenced veterinary student lecture attendance, the qualities of highly engaging lectures and perceptions related to the future of lectures within the veterinary science programme. Both student and staff perspectives on these topics were sought, with preliminary results from an online survey further explored using participant focus groups. Results were analysed qualitatively.

Speakers
TJ

Tiffany Jooste

University of Queensland


Tuesday May 15, 2018 8:30am - 9:00am
Plaza P2 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

8:30am

Management of a Canine Distemper Virus outbreak in a ferret rescue facility
This is the story of denial, disbelief, acceptance and action. The players are an unsuspecting vet, a devoted, self-funded ferret rescuer and a cast of 57 unvaccinated ferrets, either homeless and rescued or owned and boarding (timing was just before Easter). These ferrets had been potentially exposed to the highly contagious and deadly Canine Distemper Virus in an environment that could allow rapid spread. Action had to be fast and decisive and included a site visit, immediate quarantine of infected ferrets and individual cages within the facility, stopping ferret traffic in and out of the facility indefinitely, protocols for daily cleaning and disinfection, vaccination of the population, targeted and preventative treatments of individual ferrets. This was achieved within 36 hours and we were able to save 50 ferrets. The facility has remained Canine Distemper Virus free for 18 months.

Speakers

Tuesday May 15, 2018 8:30am - 9:00am
Plaza P3 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

9:00am

Equine Arboviruses of Australia
Australia has a diverse population of arthropod-borne (arbo-) viruses. Many of these don’t cause disease, however, some can cause severe disease in humans and animals. In horses, the mosquito-borne West Nile (Kunjin), Murray Valley encephalitis and Ross River viruses can cause neurological or musculo-skeletal disease. This presentation will review current knowledge on the pathology, diagnosis and epidemiology of the diseases associated with these viruses, and the implications for surveillance and reporting will be considered.

Speakers
avatar for David Williams

David Williams

Group Leader, CSIRO Australian Animal Health Laboratory
Dr David Williams is the leader of the Emergency Disease Laboratory Diagnosis group at the CSIRO Australian Animal Health Laboratory, Geelong, Victoria. This group comprises multidisciplinary capability in virus diagnostics, contributing to national and regional emergency animal disease... Read More →


Tuesday May 15, 2018 9:00am - 9:30am
Mezzanine M2 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

9:00am

Adaptive eLearning for veterinary science – students as partners
The School of Veterinary Science, The University of Queensland has created a vertically and horizontally integrated, program-wide online adaptive eLearning tutorial suite. Each adaptive eLearning lesson was structured as a full veterinary consultation, from client arrival to patient discharge. The focus of each consultation was determined by the student’s progression through the Bachelor of Veterinary Science (BVSc) and the content was drawn from multiple courses. Academics developed a ‘Storyboard’ document, detailing the content of each step of the consultation, indicating question styles and the targeted feedback given for a variety of responses on each screen of the tutorial. These Storyboards then underwent student and academic review and modification and were then passed on to the ‘Lesson Designers’ (BVSc students) to transfer the storyboard into the Smart Sparrow adaptive eLearning platform. Once designed the interactive lessons were then tested for functionality and reviewed again by students and academics prior to deployment to the student cohorts. Having the involvement of both faculty and students was integral to the success of this project. Student involvement underpinned the pedagogical philosophy of this project in that they were part of the creation and review of interactive content, analysis and continuous improvement of the lessons created.

Speakers
JG

Justine Gibson

University of Queensland


Tuesday May 15, 2018 9:00am - 9:30am
Plaza P2 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

9:00am

Avian anaesthesia
Avian patients have unique anatomy and physiology that can complicate even simple procedures and make anaesthesia challenging. From air sacs and pneumatic bones to feathers and thin skin, the unusual features of birds can significantly impact on the success of even brief anaesthetic events. In addition to unique anatomical features birds are adept at hiding signs of illness that can further complicate anaesthesia and inherently increase the risk of problems occurring. Understanding the fundamental differences between birds and mammals, as well as how these differences relate to anaesthetising these patients, is important for reducing the incidence of complications. The common complications of anaesthesia in birds will be detailed and will highlight where changes can be made in the anaesthetic protocol to improve success. Techniques to avoid common problems, such as hypoventilation and hypothermia will also be discussed. This focus on a number of basic steps before, during and after anaesthesia will help practitioners improve morbidity and mortality rates in avian patients.

Speakers
MC

Melinda Cowan

SASH Vets


Tuesday May 15, 2018 9:00am - 9:30am
Plaza P3 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

9:00am

Management of Allergic Skin Disease: Immunotherapy (SCIT versus SLIT)
A number of new therapeutic modalities are available for the therapeutic management of pruritic skin disease in the dog. This presentation will review the efficacy of these drugs and how to integrate these for the management of acute and chronic pruritic dermatitis

Speakers
MB

Mandy Burrows

College of Veterinary Medicine, School of Veterinary and Life Sciences, Murdoch University


Tuesday May 15, 2018 9:00am - 10:00am
Great Hall Doors 1 and 8 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

9:00am

Colitis in the horse with a focus on right dorsal (RDUC)

Tuesday May 15, 2018 9:00am - 10:00am
Mezzanine M1 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

9:00am

Use of Psychotropic Medications and Nutraceuticals for Acute Anxiety in Cats
Discussion of pharmacological options for acute amelioration of feline distress. From new nutraceuticals to favorite old drugs; from research to clinical applications; this presentation provides an overview of pharmaceutical and nutraceuticals anxiolytics which may reduce acute anxiety or fears in cats.

Speakers
avatar for Theresa DePorter

Theresa DePorter

Oakland Veterinary Referral Services
Board Certified Veterinary Behaviourist at Oakland Veterinary Referral Services in metropolitan Detroit Michigan USA  Graduated from Purdue in 1992.  Diplomate in both the American College of Veterinary Behaviorists (ACVB) and European College of Animal Welfare and Behavioural Medicine... Read More →


Tuesday May 15, 2018 9:00am - 10:00am
Mezzanine M3 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

9:00am

What leaders do that mean managers can actually manage
Managers at any practice are required to control people and / or processes in order to achieve a goal: 15% of clients signed up to the health plan, or team turnover rates down to

Speakers
avatar for Alison Lambert

Alison Lambert

Managing Director, On Switch
A farmer's daughter from Yorkshire, Alison qualified from Liverpool University in 1989. She worked in practice for several years before pursuing a business career with Hills Pet Nutrition and MARS, where she discovered the passion for the customer experience that her award-winning... Read More →


Tuesday May 15, 2018 9:00am - 10:00am
Mezzanine M4 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

9:00am

A practical approach to treat lame cows in the farm
Treating lame cows is often a challenging and frustrating scenario for recent graduates but also experienced veterinarians. Such difficulties originate from a lack of practical knowledge in relation to restraining cows safely for proper examination of the hooves. The purpose of this presentation is to offer a practical approach for the effective treatment of lame cows in the farm. Proper restraining techniques for different facilities will be discussed as well as potential advantanges and disadvantages for each method. The presentation will also include recommendations for the treatment and management of common problems causing lameness in cattle, with emphasis on claw horn disruption lesions (sole ulcers, sole haemorrhages and white line disease). Practical tips for the use and maintenance of knives, power tools and correct application of blocks and other treatment options will also be covered.

Speakers
avatar for Andres Ardila

Andres Ardila

Production Animal Clinician, School of Veterinary Science, The University of Queensland, Gatton, Queensland, Australia
I completed a Bachelor of Veterinary Science in 2000 (Universidad de La Salle, Bogota - Colombia) and a Master of Natural Resource Economics in 2003 (The University of Queensland, Brisbane - Australia). I currently work as a Production Animal Clinician in the School of Veterinary... Read More →


Tuesday May 15, 2018 9:00am - 10:00am
Plaza P1 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

9:30am

African swine fever: a devastating disease of pigs
African swine fever (ASF) is a highly lethal and contagious disease of domestic and wild pigs caused by the ASF virus. It is commonly found in Africa, however in 2007 the virus spread to eastern Europe and subsequently spread to nine other countries, causing devastating impacts to their pork industries. As a result of increased travel and trade, there is now a very real risk of ASF spreading to China - the world’s largest producer of pigs – and onward spread to Australia. This represents a major threat to our biosecurity and pork industry, and would lead to a significant financial burden. This presentation will review current knowledge on the pathogenesis, epidemiology and diagnosis of ASF. Research undertaken at the Australian Animal Health Laboratory has focused on developing models of infection, diagnostic test development and evaluation, and studying host responses. Results from this research will be presented and discussed.

Speakers
avatar for David Williams

David Williams

Group Leader, CSIRO Australian Animal Health Laboratory
Dr David Williams is the leader of the Emergency Disease Laboratory Diagnosis group at the CSIRO Australian Animal Health Laboratory, Geelong, Victoria. This group comprises multidisciplinary capability in virus diagnostics, contributing to national and regional emergency animal disease... Read More →


Tuesday May 15, 2018 9:30am - 10:00am
Mezzanine M2 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

9:30am

Application of flip teaching principals to equine anaesthesia practical settings
Live animal practical classes allow students the chance to apply their learning in carefully controlled settings under the guidance of instructors. In order for students to have the most valuable learning experience, however, it is important that they arrive well prepared so that the limited time in the practical is well spent. This project attempted to apply the principles of Flipping the Classroom by asking a group of third year DVM students to view a series of videos about what would occur in an equine anaesthesia practicum prior to attendance. The remaining students attending the practical class without watching the videos and, instead, listened to the instructor verbally summarise what would occur in the practical at its start. The second group of students were permitted access to the videos after they had already completed the practicum. Students in both groups were later asked a series of Likert-based survey questions regarding their opinions of the value of the videos, their confidence regarding specific tasks within the practical class, and the teaching strategy of Flipping the Classroom.

Speakers
JC

Jennifer Carter

University of Melbourne
Jen is a Diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Anesthesia and Analgesia. She is a graduate of Ross University in St. Kitts and completed a small animal internship followed by a residency in veterinary anesthesia at North Carolina State University. Jen was an assistant professor... Read More →


Tuesday May 15, 2018 9:30am - 10:00am
Plaza P2 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

9:30am

Common Avian Consultations: What I Need and What I Need to Know?
This lecture will cover the most common reasons for avian species presenting to the veterinary clinic. It will discuss the essential equipment and skills required for general practitioners to be confident and competent when treating these avian patients.

Speakers
avatar for Hamish Baron

Hamish Baron

Resident Veterinarian, Univeristy of Sydney
Hamish Baron is a resident in avian medicine at the Avian Reptile and Exotic Pet Hospital at the University of Sydney. Passionate about all things birds, he is currently undertaking a research masters degree examining macrorhabdus ornithogaster in an attempt to improve treatment... Read More →


Tuesday May 15, 2018 9:30am - 10:00am
Plaza P3 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

10:45am

Does audience response system use in lectures improve assessment performance?
Large group lecture settings form the cornerstone of preclinical veterinary education with most lectures lasting 50 minutes. It is widely recognised, however, that student attention decreases after about 10-15 minutes of lecture, suggesting that this format is ineffective for achieving student learning outcomes. Mechanisms have been suggested to re-engage students with research indicating that student-centric activities such as asking questions are most effective. Unfortunately, asking direct questions can be prohibitive in large group lecture settings because, while students may all hear the question, it is impossible for them all to answer aloud, therefore it is likely that only the students who are chosen to answer out loud will fully engage. The use of Audience Response Devices is a potential solution to this problem as they allow each student to participate and answer while also allowing the instructor to provide direct feedback on their responses. This project evaluated the effect of including question and answer sessions using audience response devices on student engagement with lecture material as measured by their performance on multiple choice assessments for the course.

Speakers
JC

Jennifer Carter

University of Melbourne
Jen is a Diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Anesthesia and Analgesia. She is a graduate of Ross University in St. Kitts and completed a small animal internship followed by a residency in veterinary anesthesia at North Carolina State University. Jen was an assistant professor... Read More →


Tuesday May 15, 2018 10:45am - 11:15am
Plaza P2 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

10:45am

Pesky Parasites in Mammals: The good, the bad and ugly
A large number of internal and external parasites have been described in small mammals. Some are life threatening to the host, whilst others are non-pathogenic. Parasites can be a thing of beauty or of immense ugliness. This lighthearted and practical oriented presentation will summarise the clinical signs, treatment and prevention of selected parasites seen in small mammal practice. Discussion will include mange in guinea pigs, and pinworms, coccidia and tapeworms in rabbits. Aimed at general practitioners who see small mammals in practice, with an interest in unusual pets - or those looking to experience the ‘unusual’ and get away from the ‘same old’ presentation.

Speakers
avatar for Brendan Carmel

Brendan Carmel

UPAV Rep, FASAVA Committee, Warranwood Veterinary Centre 
Dr Carmel works in a small animal practice in the northeast suburbs of Melbourne where over 90% of the caseload are unusual pets. He is the co-founder and current president of the Unusual and Exotic Pet Veterinarians special interest group of the AVA; the President of the Unusual... Read More →


Tuesday May 15, 2018 10:45am - 11:15am
Plaza P3 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

10:45am

Fear free clinics
Speakers
avatar for Theresa DePorter

Theresa DePorter

Oakland Veterinary Referral Services
Board Certified Veterinary Behaviourist at Oakland Veterinary Referral Services in metropolitan Detroit Michigan USA  Graduated from Purdue in 1992.  Diplomate in both the American College of Veterinary Behaviorists (ACVB) and European College of Animal Welfare and Behavioural Medicine... Read More →


Tuesday May 15, 2018 10:45am - 11:45am
Great Hall Doors 1 and 8 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

10:45am

Common arrhythmias and causes of murmurs in horses, and how to diagnose them

Tuesday May 15, 2018 10:45am - 11:45am
Mezzanine M1 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

10:45am

How collaborative is One Health in practice?
One Health is a no-brainer, a simple concept that should work easily. After all, we are highly intelligent and highly educated professionals. But, in the words of a learned colleague “this cross-sectoral communication and collaboration should be easy, but it’s not!”. This presentation will take a critical look at the enablers or and barriers to effective collaboration, which is the cornerstone of One Health and to explore how the veterinary profession can “do its bit”. This is important because an effective One Health response depends on good communication and collaboration. The presentation is informed by my experiences working with the Fiji Ministry of Health to develop a national One Health strategy and in Queensland helping establish a One Health network. I hope to leave the audience with an appreciation of the benefits of applying systems thinking approaches to gain better understanding of One Health problems and solutions and to stimulate some tangential thoughts.

Speakers
avatar for Simon Reid

Simon Reid

University of Queensland
Associate Professor Simon Reid is a keen advocate of One Health, which is an emerging international field of research and practice integrating human, animal and ecosystem health to address health hazards at the human-animal-ecosystem interface. His formal training was in Veterinary... Read More →


Tuesday May 15, 2018 10:45am - 11:45am
Mezzanine M2 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

10:45am

The customer isn't always right: Why business ethics is not professional ethics
The standards and ethics of a good business leader may not be the same as those of a good professional. For example, finding a competitive advantage in the market may involve misleading the opposition, patenting trade secrets and skills and doing other things that may not be in the best interests of consumers and other businesses. Good professionals on the other hand will usually share specialist skills and knowledge with each other and will act in such a way as to achieve what is in their clients’ and patients’ best interest. Professionals owe a special duty of care to their patients or clients, have special duties to other professionals and responsibilities to society. While a business often strives to provide customers with what they want, a profession will aim to provide what is right and appropriate not what is wanted. For veterinarians, who have as their first priority the care of the animal, this priority can bring them into conflict with economic interests or the interests of the animal’s owner. In many ways the professional life of veterinarians is more complex and more likely to provide opportunities for conflict than the lives of other professionals. The law and codes of conduct relating to veterinarians provide an ethical framework to ensure that veterinarians work in an ethical environment and are designed to ensure that where conflicts occur the interests of the patient or the safety of the public have priority over the needs of the business. The idea of business ethics is fairly recent, most likely in response to scandals. Some firms have adopted business ethics programs whilst others maintain that there is no distinct business ethics and that the ethical principles applied elsewhere in society should apply equally to business. For many the purpose of business is seen to run counter to the principles of a healthy society. Protesters such as those who occupied Wall Street in 2011 and ‘Occupy’ protesters have argued that much of business has lost sight of the societal perspective. The need to maintain a financially viable practice creates unique ethical dilemmas for veterinarians faced with increasing demands from animal owners and the gulf between expectations and costs. In such a setting, veterinarians have a responsibility to ensure that professional ethics inform business decision-making.

Speakers
TS

Tanya Stephens

Small animal practitioner and practice owner, wildlife researcher, an MANZCVS in Animal Welfare and MSc International Animal Welfare Ethics and Law (Edinburgh). Past member of the NSW Veterinary Surgeons Board. Long term member of the NSW Civil and Administrative Tribunal. Past and... Read More →


Tuesday May 15, 2018 10:45am - 11:45am
Mezzanine M3 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

10:45am

Regional nerve blocks in equine dentistry
As the majority of equine dental procedures are performed in standing, sedated patients, regional nerve blocks allow for invasive procedures that would otherwise require general anaesthesia. They are relatively simple to perform with a minimal of equipment and allow the practitioner to perform oral surgery safely and effectively. The three most commonly utilised regional nerve blocks in equine dentistry are the maxillary, infra-orbital and inferior alveolar nerve blocks. Techniques, landmarks and a step by step processes of each nerve block will be discussed. The practitioner can be armed with some 'take home' notes to use patient-side

Speakers

Tuesday May 15, 2018 10:45am - 11:45am
Mezzanine M4 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

10:45am

Cattle Medicine - Metabolic Disorders
Metabolic disorders include abnormalities of energy and protein nutrition, and deficiencies of the major minerals calcium, phosphorous and magnesium. Most metabolic disorders arise during the period between drying off and the next peak lactation – particularly in the few weeks either side of calving. Effects range from death (hypomagnesaemia, hypocalcaemia), loss of production (ketosis, hypomagnesaemia) through to reproductive failure (hypophosphataemia). The unique carbohydrate metabolism of ruminants makes them susceptible to imbalances between fat (especially fat mobilisation from tissue) and the gluconeogenic precursors that are needed for the Kreb’s cycle to function. Hence, any situation in which this imbalance occurs (obesity, starvation, underfeeding) are at risk of developing ketosis. Deficiencies of phosphorous and magnesium can occur at any time, although magnesium deficiency is usually a problem of the peri-calving period. Calcium deficiency is typically a problem of a period within a few days of calving, is caused by the sudden drain of calcium into the milk at the onset of lactation, and can cause significant losses. All metabolic diseases are preventable by appropriate animal husbandry at critical stages of the production cycle. Thus, whilst veterinarians can successfully treat most affected animals, ensuring that farmers manage their animals to prevent such diseases is a far more cost-effective route to follow.

Speakers
avatar for Tim Parkinson

Tim Parkinson

Tim Parkinson is Professor of Farm Animal Reproduction & Health at Massey University, New Zealand. He graduated from Bristol University and initially worked in cattle practice and cattle AI in the UK. After his PhD in reproductive physiology at Nottingham University, he lectured in... Read More →


Tuesday May 15, 2018 10:45am - 11:45am
Plaza P1 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

11:15am

Altruism in the next generation- a professional trait?
Abstract (Maximum 150 words; please avoid details that identify school and/or authors) Altruism, or helping others, even at a risk or cost to oneself, is regarded as a professional trait for caring and health sciences professions such as veterinary science. This study used a choice experiment with conjoint analysis to obtain a ‘revealed’ measure of altruistic disposition. Final year veterinary students participated from three veterinary programs. The ‘experiment’ involved eight job scenarios with differing levels of three components in an ‘orthogonal design’; the respondent rated the attractiveness of each job to them. This method may be of theoretical and practical interest to researchers in veterinary education looking to avoid relying on ‘self-reporting’ using Likert scaled items. The results are ‘revealed’ measures of respondents’ values. Clusters of respondents were identified with differing levels of importance of income and altruism. Importantly, we also consider gender differences and possible implications for a profession suffering high rates of compassion fatigue and salary deflation.

Speakers
avatar for Adele Feakes

Adele Feakes

Lecturer - Veterinary Practice Management, University of Adelaide
Adele has owned a rural practice for 24 years, worked in emergency, small animal practice and as a contracting On Plant Veterinary Officer for AQIS. Adele is the immediate past president of VERA. Since 2010, Adele has been with the University of Adelaide as Lecturer – veterinary... Read More →


Tuesday May 15, 2018 11:15am - 11:45am
Plaza P2 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

11:15am

Investigation and treatment of upper respiratory tract disease
Sneezing and nasal discharge are two of the most common presenting signs noted in rabbits, and are often seen together. The differential diagnoses for sneezing in a rabbit range from the very common upper respiratory tract infections, dental disease or nasal foreign bodies, to the much rarer nasal tumours or allergies. In addition to a thorough history and full clinical exam, CT scans are proving to be the gold standard investigation technique to determine the underlying cause of sneezing in rabbits. Once the cause of sneezing has been determined, medical treatment or surgery, or a combination of both may be indicated. This session will discuss the underlying causes and how to diagnose and treat the more common, and the more uncommon causes of sneezing and nasal discharge in rabbits.

Speakers
avatar for Gerry Skinner

Gerry Skinner

The Rabbit Drs
Gerry Skinner qualified from Bristol in 2003 after switching careers from archaeology. During her exotics training in the UK she emigrated to Australia and kept emergency and critical care as her main clinical interest, gaining memberships in ECC and she ran a large Emergency Centre... Read More →


Tuesday May 15, 2018 11:15am - 11:45am
Plaza P3 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

12:00pm

Plenary - Beyond Bias: Leveraging the Power of Difference
A culture of inclusion actively seeks and values the full contribution of diverse people, skills, perspectives, and experiences. It drives better performance because it grows our collective intelligence. Diverse, inclusive teams are smarter, despite this, organisations large and small struggle to realise the benefits.
Unconscious bias is a stubborn challenge to working better with difference. Dr Whelan, Managing Director of Psynapse, will demystify what unconscious bias is, why it impacts on decision-making around diversity, why inclusive teams perform better, and will introduce some of the key mindsets that can help leverage the power of diversity.
 

Speakers
avatar for Jennifer Whelan

Jennifer Whelan

Jennifer is the founding director of Psynapse Psychometrics. A former Research Fellow at the Melbourne Business School and the University of Melbourne, Jennifer is a recognised academic expert, thought leader, and organisational consultant specialising in corporate diversity, inclusion... Read More →


Tuesday May 15, 2018 12:00pm - 1:15pm
Great Hall Doors 1 and 8 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

2:30pm

It Ate What?... Reptilian Foreign Bodies!
Reptiles are no different to mammals when it comes to consuming foreign objects. It may comes as a surprise to many the different and varied items that are swallowed and cause issues. Given the number of species involved treatment of these cases can sometimes be challenging and require a little bit of lateral thinking.

Speakers
avatar for Shane Simpson

Shane Simpson

Director, Karingal Veterinary Hospital
Dr Shane Simpson is a partner at Karingal Veterinary Hospital located south-east of Melbourne. He has a special interest in reptile and amphibian medicine and surgery with the majority of his clinical work now involving these fascinating animals. He regularly presents on this subject... Read More →


Tuesday May 15, 2018 2:30pm - 3:00pm
Plaza P3 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

2:30pm

A vet confesses: Why my pets aren’t vaccinated or wormed …A vet becomes a customer and it all goes badly wrong
Most of us working in the animal care profession have pets and horses ourselves. Yet I wouldn't mind betting that, like me, many of you don't follow the frequency of vaccination and worming that we tell our clients to adhere to. In our busy lives it's all too easy to overlook when boosters are due, but for me it's more than this - a growing body of research and informed voices questioning whether annual vaccination is required as standard have made me think twice. Owners and smallholders are better informed today than they ever have been. Rightly or wrongly, they'll access all kinds of forums and data online that may lead them to question our recommendations. By toeing the vaccination and worming party line I believe we could actually be damaging our credibility. Controversial, but true. By not providing the customer experience based on trust that we expect to receive ourselves in 'real' life, we're slowly eroding the client-practice relationship.

Speakers
avatar for Alison Lambert

Alison Lambert

Managing Director, On Switch
A farmer's daughter from Yorkshire, Alison qualified from Liverpool University in 1989. She worked in practice for several years before pursuing a business career with Hills Pet Nutrition and MARS, where she discovered the passion for the customer experience that her award-winning... Read More →


Tuesday May 15, 2018 2:30pm - 3:30pm
Great Hall Doors 1 and 8 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

2:30pm

Weight Loss and management of the starved horse
Speakers

Tuesday May 15, 2018 2:30pm - 3:30pm
Mezzanine M1 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

2:30pm

Domestic violence, animal abuse/human behaviour
The link between Interpersonal Violence and Animal Abuse has been well established. Numerous papers have focused on the link and the role of the veterinarian in recognising and reporting animal abuse. Intentional or overt animal abuse/ cruelty cases are not uncommon. The field of Veterinary Forensics is growing and Veterinarians are more likely to identify cases of non-accidental injury in practice. Animal cruelty can also occur as a result of neglect or a failure to provide for an animal under the care of the owner or person in charge. In Animal hoarding and puppy farming cases, there are poor welfare outcomes for large numbers of animals. Whilst the physical results of abuse are easier to identify, psychological distress and pain should always be considered in any animal cruelty case. The underlying human behaviour and motivation that results in animal cruelty varies and this will determine the approach we use to achieve better outcomes.

Speakers
avatar for Magdoline Awad

Magdoline Awad

Chief Veterinary Officer, Petsure Australia
Dr Magdoline Awad (or Mags) has a Veterinary Science degree from the University of Sydney. She was Chief Veterinarian at RSPCA NSW from 2008-2015. Mags has a graduate degree in Veterinary Professional Practice Management, and Membership of the Australian and New Zealand College of... Read More →


Tuesday May 15, 2018 2:30pm - 3:30pm
Mezzanine M2 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

2:30pm

Behaviour Modification: Can’t the trainer do it?
Many vets ask about behaviour modification. There is confusion about the goals of behaviour modification and when and how it should be used as a treatment for mental health disorders. While good trainers can help with the implementation of a behaviour modification program, the veterinarian must understand and know how to plan the program.

Speakers
JL

Jacqui Ley

VBSA/MVSC
Registered Specialist in Veterinary Behavioural Medicine. Owner of Veterinary Behaviour Services Australia and sees cases at the Melbourne Veterinary Specialist Centre in Melbourne. Interest in the mental health of all species and the diagnosis and treatment of mental health diso... Read More →


Tuesday May 15, 2018 2:30pm - 3:30pm
Mezzanine M3 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

2:30pm

Equine Dentistry: When to Tackle What: DIY or refer?
Good decisions come from experience, and experience comes from bad decisions. The simple extraction that turned into an 8-hour marathon. The client on the phone every 30 minutes asking if you have finished yet? The "while you are here" job that ends up going pear shaped. This talk will detail some tricks of the trade that will help you to plan for success and avoid those situations in which you wish you never started. From careful case selection to owner discussions pre-surgery, how to quote for extractions and knowing when to stop, and most importantly when to ask for help! Discussions will be illustrated with personal anecdotes of real cases (names will be changed to protect the not-so innocent)

Speakers

Tuesday May 15, 2018 2:30pm - 3:30pm
Mezzanine M4 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

2:30pm

Cattle Medicine - Neurological Disease
The presence of a neurological lesion is suggested by a change in behaviour, mental status, gait, posture and balance, or abnormalities of the special senses. Examination of the neurological system of the adult cow presents some special challenges due to the size and temperament of cattle. Nonetheless, the same principles apply as for any animal - the purpose is to establish whether a neurological abnormality exists and, if so, to determine the site and nature of the lesion. During the examination, it will be necessary to differentiate between signs attributable to the four components of the nervous system (brain, cranial nerves, spinal cord, peripheral nerves). Disorders of the neurological system in post-weaning cattle are much more likely to be of infectious origin or due to toxicities than to other causes. Cattle with congenital neurological disorders are unlikely to survive beyond calf-hood, so such lesions, along with neoplasia and CNS trauma are uncommon in older cattle. Thus, bacterial infections of the brain or meninges (e.g. Listeria monocytogenes, Histophilus somni), spinal abscesses and clostridial toxins (tetanus, botulism) are common infectious causes, whilst thiamine deficiency, magnesium deficiency, lead toxicity and grass toxicities (e.g. ryegrass staggers) are common dietary accidents . But there are also a great many rare toxic causes of neurological disorders, some of which require careful diagnosis to eliminate the specific aetiological factors that have causes the disease. It is important not to forget that there are important exotic/notifiable causes of neurological diseases – of which rabies, spongiform encephalopathy and, perhaps, Aujeszky’s disease are of very considerable biosecurity importance.

Speakers
avatar for Tim Parkinson

Tim Parkinson

Tim Parkinson is Professor of Farm Animal Reproduction & Health at Massey University, New Zealand. He graduated from Bristol University and initially worked in cattle practice and cattle AI in the UK. After his PhD in reproductive physiology at Nottingham University, he lectured in... Read More →


Tuesday May 15, 2018 2:30pm - 3:30pm
Plaza P1 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

2:30pm

Poster Session (Education)
Tuesday May 15, 2018 2:30pm - 3:30pm
Plaza P2 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

3:00pm

Once bitten: the delights and perils of treating venomous creatures
Speakers
avatar for Robert Johnson

Robert Johnson

Principal/partner, Australian Veterinary Association
Robert Johnson graduated from the University of Sydney in 1977. He runs a small animal, wildlife and reptile practice in Penrith, NSW with his veterinarian wife Jane. Robert is a Director of the Board of the AVA, President of the Unusual Pet and Avian SIG of the AVA and Australian... Read More →


Tuesday May 15, 2018 3:00pm - 3:30pm
Plaza P3 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

4:00pm

The Hendra virus vaccine: a review of antibody responses in the field
Sporadically, Hendra virus (HeV) spills over from flying foxes to horses. Horses act as amplifying hosts for HeV, thereby enabling transmission of the virus to other horses, dogs, and humans. Since 2012 a HeV vaccine for horses is available and owners have the choice to vaccinate their horses. However, uptake of HeV vaccination has been slow due to different perception of HeV risks and perceived barriers such as costs, efficacy and safety concerns, and yearly boosters. Anecdotal evidence suggest that some owners choose to test their horses’ HeV antibody titre rather than to booster. However, little is known about HeV antibody titres in horses in the field. This presentation will cover a quantitative analysis of HeV antibody titres in vaccinated horses based on laboratory submissions to the Australian Animal Health Laboratory (AAHL) in Geelong. In addition, equine veterinarians submitting samples for HeV titre testing were interviewed via telephone. This qualitative component helped to elucidate veterinarians’ and horse owners’ perceptions and attitudes towards HeV titre testing and how titre results influence veterinary advice and recommended actions.

Speakers
AW

Anke Weitholter

The University of Melbourne
Anke is a veterinary graduate of the Free University of Berlin, Germany and has a keen interest in health behaviour and infectious disease epidemiology at the wildlife-livestock-human interface. In 2009, she completed a Doctorate in Veterinary Medicine on prion diseases in mouflon... Read More →


Tuesday May 15, 2018 4:00pm - 4:30pm
Mezzanine M1 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

4:00pm

Veterinarians making ethical decisions - how do they do it?
It is acknowledged that having an understanding of how veterinarians approach ethical dilemmas, where there is no single right answer, would help inform future education and practice (Mullan 2012, Berry 2014), but there seems to be very little research or information in this area. This project used qualitative research methods to document the types of ethical issues veterinarians describe and explore their responses. The project aimed to investigate what types of ethical issues do veterinarians encounter when working in small animal practice; and what decisions do they make and why do they come to these conclusions? It is particularly important to understand the development of this process in these Veterinarians so that support in the form of ethics-based professional development programs can be developed and at the level of vet training, enabling academic staff to develop a relevant framework that is appropriate for particular clinical settings, in the teaching of veterinary ethics and ethical decision making.

Speakers
LR

Leonie Richards

University of Melbourne


Tuesday May 15, 2018 4:00pm - 4:30pm
Plaza P2 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

4:00pm

Wildlife rescue and rehabilitation - the conservation and ethical conundrum
Veterinarians play an essential role in the treatment and rehabilitation of wildlife in Australia. They treat thousands of wildlife casualties every year, developing species specific knowledge and skills. In addition wildlife rescue and rehabilitation allows local communities to become involved in wildlife conservation and management and increases public awareness of local environmental issues. However, it also involves considerable human intervention in the lives of wild animals raising emotional, political, ethical, health, welfare and ecological issues and its contribution to the conservation of wildlife species is debatable. Consequently the practice has become the focus of controversy and debate, and its overall effectiveness remains unclear, as important aspects of the process, such as post-release morbidity, mortality, fecundity and dispersal have not been clearly assessed or studied. There are still large gaps in our knowledge of wildlife rehabilitation, and the priorities for improving wildlife rehabilitation practices all involve veterinarians. These include further research and investigation into post-release outcomes, greater sharing of information among wildlife rehabilitation groups and veterinarians to ensure best practice protocols and to improve animal welfare, greater awareness by state government departments of the role of private veterinarians in wildlife rehabilitation, and for veterinarians to take a more active role in wildlife rehabilitation groups, advising state departments and through public education.


Tuesday May 15, 2018 4:00pm - 4:30pm
Plaza P3 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

4:00pm

Feline pemphigus foliaceus: diagnosis and management
Feline pemphigus foliaceus is the most common immune mediated skin disease in the cat. This lecture will review the data from a retrospective review by the author and present the clinical, diagnostic, treatment and prognostic outcome of cats with pemphigus foliaceus.

Speakers
MB

Mandy Burrows

College of Veterinary Medicine, School of Veterinary and Life Sciences, Murdoch University


Tuesday May 15, 2018 4:00pm - 5:00pm
Great Hall Doors 1 and 8 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

4:00pm

Feline tooth resorption
Tooth resorption (TR) is one of the most common oral pathology in feline patients with a reported prevalence of 28-67%. In the past, TR was also known as cat caries, neck lesions, cervical line lesions, pink spot of mummery, and Feline Odontoclastic Resorption Lesion (FORL). A progressive loss of tooth substance characterizes TR and it is known as a painful condition causing anorexia, ptyalism, lethargy, dysphagia, and oral sensitivity or “mouth shyness” depending on the severity. It is widely known that the treatment of TR can be either surgical extraction or intentional coronectomy (crown amputation) of the affected tooth. However, opinions on the treatment selection may be varied among small animal practitioners. This presentation is aimed to guide clinicians in understanding the American Veterinary Dental College (AVDC) classification of TR stages and types and their clinical importance in choosing the appropriate treatment option for the affected patient. Both techniques will also be described along with the potential complications.

Speakers
avatar for Williana Basuki

Williana Basuki

Practice Limited to Veterinary Dentistry, Tufts Veterinary Emergency Treatment and Specialties
Dr. Williana Basuki was born and grew up in Indonesia. She earned her veterinary degree at the University of Queensland in 2010. After university, she embarked on her journey as a small animal practitioner before entering a rotating internship followed by a surgery internship at Queensland... Read More →


Tuesday May 15, 2018 4:00pm - 5:00pm
Mezzanine M2 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

4:00pm

Raising a sane cat
Cats are usually great pets – but not always. Why? Because they sometimes behave in ways that owners may find difficult to understand and / or manage. Behaviour is determined by several factors including the cat’s genetic predisposition, what they have learnt from past experiences as well as the environment in which they find themselves. So knowing what to do to help cats grow in to well - mannered cats starts with the breeder. Understanding how to handle the queen, how to help build resilience in the kitten as well as raise the kitten before they go to their new home are just some things to consider. Once the kitten goes to its new home the new owners have to be educated about how best to look after both the physical health of the kitten but also its mental health. The dissemination of up to date evidence based information is an important role for veterinarians to help breeders and owners raise a sane Kitten.

Speakers
KS

Kersti Seksel

Sydney Animal Behaviour Service
After graduating from Sydney University as a veterinarian Kersti completed a BA in Behavioural Sciences and a MA (Hons). She is a Fellow of the Australian and New Zealand College of Veterinary Scientists, a Diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Behaviorists and a Diplomate... Read More →


Tuesday May 15, 2018 4:00pm - 5:00pm
Mezzanine M3 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

4:00pm

Production Animal Emergency Management
Emergency management is an aspect of production animal clinical practice that is mentally and physically demanding. A sound approach can alleviate some of the stress and result in greater success. A book can easily be written on this topic and many of the conditions listed devoted to their own chapters. We will focus on the clinical emergencies that are most common and discuss some tips and tricks. This talk is an overview of many conditions and not a full review of any one condition. We will discuss decision making in emergency situations and immediate treatments. Surgical medical and theriogenology topics will be covered. Specific topics to be covered include acute abdominal, respiratory, reproductive, and urinary emergencies.

Speakers
BF

Brandon Fraser

Queensland University


Tuesday May 15, 2018 4:00pm - 5:00pm
Plaza P1 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

4:00pm

VetEd Talks
Be inspired. Listen, learn, laugh and cry. Eight short presentations for colleagues sharing their passion for our profession.

Tuesday May 15, 2018 4:00pm - 6:00pm
Mezzanine M4 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

4:30pm

Psittacosis, placentas, foals and students
Horses have recently been identified as a source of Chlamydia psittaci for human infection. This presentation will outline the outbreaks that led to the identification of this emerging threat, discuss potential risk factors, control measures and current and future research in this area.

Speakers
JH

Jane Heller

After graduation, Jane worked initially in small animal medicine in private practice, before undertaking an internship and then a Master of Veterinary Clinical Studies at the University of Sydney, where she was ‘switched on’ to Veterinary Epidemiology. Jane then went to the University... Read More →


Tuesday May 15, 2018 4:30pm - 5:00pm
Mezzanine M1 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

4:30pm

Perfect match! How employers select new graduate veterinarians for employment
How do employers approach the selection of new graduate veterinarians for employment? Using semi-structured interviews, and criterion sampling for maximal variation, this study aimed to explore the nuances of, and rationale behind, employer perspectives, opinions and decision-making processes when selecting new graduate veterinarians for employment. Eighteen employers were interviewed either face-to-face, by telephone or via Skype. Data were analysed using thematic analysis, within the context of a social constructivist lens. Extending on previous quantitative work, this study captures greater detail related to desirable employee attributes, and how each is appraised and evaluated by employers during their selection processes. Findings from this project emphasise the critical role that employer circumstances and needs can play in the selection of new graduate veterinarians for employment, and the influence of perceptions of candidate job suitability, and employee-workplace match.

Speakers

Tuesday May 15, 2018 4:30pm - 5:00pm
Plaza P2 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

4:30pm

The wild koala consult
Private practitioners and veterinary emergency centres may be presented with sick or injured koalas that require treatment (or at times, euthanasia), before they are transported to a wildlife hospital or rehabilitation facility. The welfare and outcome of these individuals is heavily dependent upon the veterinary staff’s ability to accurately assess, identify and appropriately manage the immediate offending injury or disease. This presentation aims to delivery practical advice on triage, anaesthesia, clinical examination, diagnostic procedures and emergency treatment to veterinarians and veterinary nurses. Choice of anaesthesia and treatment, and the diagnostic procedures discussed here are those that most well equipped private practices and emergency facilities should be able to undertake. Ongoing treatment and rehabilitation is highly specialised in koalas and as such, koalas admitted to domestic animal facilities should be promptly transferred to a suitable specialised wildlife hospital after emergency treatment has been provided.

Speakers

Tuesday May 15, 2018 4:30pm - 5:00pm
Plaza P3 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

5:00pm

Attributes university students think veterinary employees value in their employees
A survey of students from five Australian veterinary schools included an open ended question about the attributes they thought veterinary employers value most in their employees. Veterinary student participants (n=450) were either mid-way or in final year of their veterinary programs. Textual data was evaluated using qualitative content and frequency analysis to ascertain attributes students identified as important and to determine how this compared with attributes valued by veterinary employers. Differences in student’s perspective according to year level in the veterinary program were also explored. There is currently limited research specifically addressing perspectives of veterinary students with respect to attributes valued by veterinary employers. It is unknown whether the perspectives of students regarding important veterinary employee attributes align with the perspectives of employers. The findings of this study help inform veterinary program curriculum design by identifying differences in expectations between students and employers, enabling student understanding of veterinary employer expectations of new graduates to be improved.

Speakers
WH

Wendy Hamood

University of Adelaide


Tuesday May 15, 2018 5:00pm - 5:30pm
Plaza P2 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

5:00pm

Understanding the factors influencing chlamydial blindness in koalas
Chlamydia pecorum is a key pathogen of the koala (Phascolarctos cinereus). Similar to Chlamydia trachomatis infections in humans (trachoma), ocular infections lead to debilitating blindness. While disease pathologies appear to mirror that of human trachoma, the factors that influence koala chlamydial ocular disease progression are currently unknown. In the present study, a range of microbiological and immunological factors were assessed in a large cross-sectional cohort of koalas with different stages of chlamydial ocular disease. Using a C. pecorum-specific qPCR, a strong relationship was found between chlamydial load and the onset of acute and chronic active disease. Similar to human studies, however, the progression to late stage scarring pathologies was independent of chlamydial load. While no strong relationship was observed between retroviral co-infection and systemic humoral immune responses to C. pecorum, RNASeq analysis of the mucosal response revealed key differences in the expression of proinflammatory cytokines between healthy infected and diseased animals as well as the presence of additional key host cell markers that may be used to predict the outcome of a koala C. pecorum ocular infection and to support the ongoing evaluation of a prototype koala chlamydial vaccine.

Speakers
AP

Adam Polkinghorne

University of Sunshine Coast


Tuesday May 15, 2018 5:00pm - 5:30pm
Plaza P3 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

5:00pm

Management of allergic skin disease: immunotherapy (subcutaneous versus sublingual)
Immunotherapy is a useful therapeutic strategy for the management of atopic dermatitis in dogs and cats. This presentation will review the commonly used methods of subcutaneous and sublingual immunotherapy in dogs and cats and discuss the advantages and disadvantages of both methods.

Speakers
MB

Mandy Burrows

College of Veterinary Medicine, School of Veterinary and Life Sciences, Murdoch University


Tuesday May 15, 2018 5:00pm - 6:00pm
Great Hall Doors 1 and 8 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

5:00pm

Practical biosecurity for day to day practice - raising the bar
The risk of zoonosis for the Equine veterinarian is increasing and the profession must respond. The emergence of Hendra virus has highlighted the serious occupational risk of zoonotic disease with the tragic death of two veterinarians and the infection of a vet nurse. There is, however more out there than Hendra. Recent Chlamydia psittaci infection in Australian veterinary personnel has revealed risk associated with performing obstetric procedures were excessive contamination with body fluids is common. The commensal bacterium Streptococcus equi is well documented to have caused devastating infection in humans. There is a known higher prevalence of MRSA in the nasal passages of veterinarians and the rise in multi resistant bacteria in equines also requires us to become more vigilant. Emerging diseases and novel spill over events such as Australian Bat Lyssavirus (rabies) highlights the difficulty with identifying the risk, which necessitates the need for practical biosecurity in day to day practice as a matter of routine. HIV was the catalyst for significant cultural change in the human medical profession during the 1980's; can the veterinary profession respond similarly?

Speakers
avatar for Nathan Anthony

Nathan Anthony

Practice Principal, West Vets
Nathan is the Practice Principal of WestVETS Animal Hospitals. Graduating in 1997, he eventually settled in western Brisbane where he started WestVETS as a one vet ambulatory practice which has now grown into a 15 vet referral equine hospital and reproduction centre set on two sites... Read More →


Tuesday May 15, 2018 5:00pm - 6:00pm
Mezzanine M1 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

5:00pm

Feline gingivostomatitis - things that we all need to know!
To end our second day, we will tackle the topic of feline gingivostomatitis. Feline gingivostomatitis or stomatitis is known as a severe and debilitating chronic inflammatory disease of the oral cavity affecting the gum tissue (gingiva) and the oral mucosa. Fortunately, it is not very common and its prevalence is known to be about 0.7-12% of the general population. At the beginning of this presentation, we will discuss the common presenting signs and the potential differential diagnoses of other oral inflammation that occur in our feline patients along with the appropriate diagnostic work up. Treatment options such as full mouth vs. partial mouth extractions along with other adjunct therapies such as immunomodulatory medications, pain management, and laser therapy will be discussed. This condition can be very frustrating for both clinicians and pet owners, making client communication and managing client expectations crucial. A brief presentation of a clinical case will also be provided at the end of the lecture. Attendees are also encouraged to share their experiences in managing this disease at the end of the presentation.

Speakers
avatar for Williana Basuki

Williana Basuki

Practice Limited to Veterinary Dentistry, Tufts Veterinary Emergency Treatment and Specialties
Dr. Williana Basuki was born and grew up in Indonesia. She earned her veterinary degree at the University of Queensland in 2010. After university, she embarked on her journey as a small animal practitioner before entering a rotating internship followed by a surgery internship at Queensland... Read More →


Tuesday May 15, 2018 5:00pm - 6:00pm
Mezzanine M2 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

5:00pm

PANEL:Terminology - Labels stick
Speakers
avatar for Theresa DePorter

Theresa DePorter

Oakland Veterinary Referral Services
Board Certified Veterinary Behaviourist at Oakland Veterinary Referral Services in metropolitan Detroit Michigan USA  Graduated from Purdue in 1992.  Diplomate in both the American College of Veterinary Behaviorists (ACVB) and European College of Animal Welfare and Behavioural Medicine... Read More →
JL

Jacqui Ley

VBSA/MVSC
Registered Specialist in Veterinary Behavioural Medicine. Owner of Veterinary Behaviour Services Australia and sees cases at the Melbourne Veterinary Specialist Centre in Melbourne. Interest in the mental health of all species and the diagnosis and treatment of mental health diso... Read More →
KS

Kersti Seksel

Sydney Animal Behaviour Service
After graduating from Sydney University as a veterinarian Kersti completed a BA in Behavioural Sciences and a MA (Hons). She is a Fellow of the Australian and New Zealand College of Veterinary Scientists, a Diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Behaviorists and a Diplomate... Read More →


Tuesday May 15, 2018 5:00pm - 6:00pm
Mezzanine M3 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

5:00pm

Trace Minerals for Cattle 101 - Diagnosis, Treatment and Monitoring
Managing trace mineral issues in cattle can be straighforward with an understanding of the basics of trace mineral nutrition. Effective diagnosis, treatment and management of trace mineral issues not only improves production outcomes for cattle but can also provide an opportunity to for vets to offer improved herd health programs and develop further income streams for a practice.

Speakers

Tuesday May 15, 2018 5:00pm - 6:00pm
Plaza P1 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

5:30pm

Excellence in teaching winner
Tuesday May 15, 2018 5:30pm - 6:00pm
Plaza P2 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

5:30pm

Population genetics of Chlamydia pecorum infections in livestock and marsupials
Chlamydia pecorum is a cause of population declines across many mainland koala populations. It is also endemic to many Australian sheep and cattle breeds, with previous molecular evidence suggesting a close relationship between strains from each host group. Whilst C. pecorum represents a severe problem for koalas in Queensland and New South Wales (‘northern koalas’) it also infects koalas in Victoria and South Australia (‘southern koalas’) where less reports of disease are apparent. To investigate the genetic relationships between strains from different koala populations and to those from livestock in Australia and around the world, we have begun to build a population genetic framework for this important veterinary pathogen. Comparative genomics of C. pecorum have thus far revealed that the majority of koala strains from northern and southern koalas belong to separate evolutionary lineages. Fine-detailed analysis of strains from southern koalas reveals evidence consistent with the management of this population over the last century, including the dissemination of genetic-related strains through koala translocation. Comparison of strains to livestock revealed further molecular evidence of historical and contemporary spillover of C. pecorum from introduced livestock. The latter supports a hypothesis that koala C. pecorum infections are the result of several rare spillover events from livestock and subsequent adaptation to a marsupial host in the recent history of this pathogen.

Speakers
AP

Adam Polkinghorne

University of Sunshine Coast


Tuesday May 15, 2018 5:30pm - 6:00pm
Plaza P3 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre
 
Wednesday, May 16
 

8:00am

Why you need to know about online relinquishments of pets
Most people associate relinquishment of pets with pounds/shelters. In this study we examined ads on a popular online website (gumtree.com.au) in Australia to identify dogs and cats being relinquished. In February 2016 a total of 2640 ads for dogs and 2093 ads for cats being relinquished were identified. Approximately 51% and 45% of ads were for pure breed and cross breed dogs, respectively, with a minority of cat ads stating breed and most of these pure bred. The most common dog breeds were the Staffordshire Terrier and Kelpie, while the Ragdoll and Domestic Shorthair were the most common cat breeds. Compared to the State human populations, ads for relinquished pets on Gumtree were over-represented in Queensland and under-represented in Victoria. More of the cat than dog ads were for free animals. A total of 15 people who relinquished a pet on gumtree-com.au were surveyed, and reasons for using the website included: they thought the shelters were full; wanted to see/interview the new owner; originally got the animal on Gumtree, and; used Gumtree for other things and it works. The data collected highlights the internet as a major platform used by people relinquishing their pets. Although the internet provides an efficient system to find new homes, risks include new owners not being informed of behavioural problems (e.g. aggression), and the potential for hoarders to pick up free animals. Regulation may not be the answer, but research to develop guidelines is necessary to protect the welfare of relinquished pets and their owners.

Speakers
avatar for Susan Hazel

Susan Hazel

Senior Lecturer, University of Adelaide
Susan Hazel is a veterinary graduate from the University of Sydney. She is a Senior Lecturer in the School of Animal & Veterinary Sciences at the University of Adelaide and teaches in animal behaviour, welfare and ethics. Susan is a Member of 2 South Australian Animal Ethics Committees... Read More →


Wednesday May 16, 2018 8:00am - 8:30am
Plaza P2 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

8:00am

Successful parasite control on goat farms
Speakers
avatar for Sandra Baxendell

Sandra Baxendell

Goat Veterinary Consultancies - goatvetoz, Goat Veterinary Consultancies
Dr Sandra Baxendell graduated from the University of Qld vet school in 1975 as dux and with a University Medal. She then went on and did her PhD, using goats as her experimental animal. After a career in government and academia, she now operates a goats only practice. Sandra is also... Read More →


Wednesday May 16, 2018 8:00am - 8:30am
Plaza P3 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

8:00am

Transfusion based laboratory testing
Blood transfusion is often a life-saving therapeutic intervention; however, appropriate product usage relies on good quality diagnostic tests prior to administration. Tests which are particularly important in the transfusion patient, are blood typing, crossmatching, and Coombs' testing. How these tests work, what they are useful for, what can go wrong, which of these tests are available (and necessary) for use in-house, and common diseases which can cause these tests to be invalid will be discussed.

Speakers
avatar for Karen Jackson

Karen Jackson

ASAV Committee, University of Queensland
I'm a clinical pathologist with a passion for haematology, immunohaematology, transfusion medicine, oncology, and education.


Wednesday May 16, 2018 8:00am - 9:00am
Great Hall Doors 1 and 8 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

8:00am

Endocrine laminitis
Recent research has stratified the causes of laminitis in horses into 3 main categories: a. (Systemic) Inflammatory caused by systemic diseases accompanied by clinical indicators of endotoxemia (systemic inflammatory response syndrome or SIRS), including enterocolitis, pleuropneumonia, retained fetal membranes or grain overload; b. Weight bearing laminitis and; c. Endocrinopathic laminitis, associated with pituitary pars intermedia dysfunction (PPID) or Equine Metabolic Syndrome (EMS). Common to both these conditions are disturbed glucose and insulin regulation and, most importantly, the development of insulin dysregulation which in the horse is manifest as hyperinsulinaemia. Endocrinopathic laminitis has been shown to be the most common cause of laminitis presenting primarily as lameness from laminitis rather than secondary to presenting for acute severe illness and hospitalisation. The aims of this presentation are to: 1. Outline what we know about the relationship between insulin and laminitis, including what we have learned from field studies and the experimental model of hyperinsulinaemia developed in Australia. 2. Discuss what we have learned from the histology of endocrinopathic laminitis. 3. Outline how the above has led to new hypotheses as to how endocrinopathic laminitis occurs. 4. Discuss the clinical implications of this knowledge.

Speakers
avatar for Cathy McGowan

Cathy McGowan

University of Liverpool
Cathy is Professor of Equine Internal Medicine, Head of Department, Equine Clinical Science at The University of Liverpool, Institute of Veterinary Science.Graduating from the University of Sydney (1991) she has aPhD in equine exercise physiology, RCVS and European Diplomas and recognised... Read More →


Wednesday May 16, 2018 8:00am - 9:00am
Mezzanine M1 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

8:00am

Periodontal disease – pathogenesis and treatment options
Periodontal disease is defined as the inflammation and infection of the periodontium and it is the most common oral pathology diagnosed in the dog with up to 80% of the canine population affected by the age of 2. Periodontal disease is a progressive and debilitating disease that may lead to systemic ramifications and early disease recognition is crucial by clinicians. Performing a thorough oral examination along with intraoral radiographs are important for diagnosing and generating an appropriate treatment planning for individual patient. Clinicians also needs to be aware that each treatment planning should also be based on client’s expectation and patient’s compliance; therefore, client communication and education are essential in every periodontal disease case. This lecture is aimed to discuss the pathogenesis of periodontal disease along with the available treatment and management options such as professional dental prophylaxis, perioceutical treatment, bone grafts, and root planing. A brief discussion on oral home care will also be presented.

Speakers
avatar for Williana Basuki

Williana Basuki

Practice Limited to Veterinary Dentistry, Tufts Veterinary Emergency Treatment and Specialties
Dr. Williana Basuki was born and grew up in Indonesia. She earned her veterinary degree at the University of Queensland in 2010. After university, she embarked on her journey as a small animal practitioner before entering a rotating internship followed by a surgery internship at Queensland... Read More →


Wednesday May 16, 2018 8:00am - 9:00am
Mezzanine M2 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

8:00am

Helping those in need: behavioural care for rescue, shelter and newly adopted dogs
How to support the behavioural needs of dogs in rescue organisations, animal shelters and in their new homes.

Speakers

Wednesday May 16, 2018 8:00am - 9:00am
Mezzanine M3 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

8:00am

Making vet care easy to use, simplify the processes and employ better people   
Every single piece of research done with pet and horse owners, smallholders and farmers alike confirms that the key aspect of their chosen veterinary care provider is convenience. They want to be able to get to and contact the practice quickly. They want the phone answering when they call, and they want to receive advice tailored to the needs of them and their animals. They want to book appointments online, access test results quickly and speak to an expert quickly when needed. It sounds obvious, but so many practices overlook the important tiny details of convenience. In this session we'll explore the customer journey from start to finish and identify touch points where you can make things easier for your clients. This may involve subtle changes to practice protocols, an overhaul of processes or training and coaching for the entire team - whatever it takes to truly put the consumer at the heart of everything you do.

Speakers
avatar for Alison Lambert

Alison Lambert

Managing Director, On Switch
A farmer's daughter from Yorkshire, Alison qualified from Liverpool University in 1989. She worked in practice for several years before pursuing a business career with Hills Pet Nutrition and MARS, where she discovered the passion for the customer experience that her award-winning... Read More →


Wednesday May 16, 2018 8:00am - 9:00am
Mezzanine M4 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

8:00am

Cattle Medicine - Disorders of the Reproductive System
Most of the common and important disorders of the reproductive system are consequent upon calving: the uterus has to undergo involution and eliminate the residual infection of calving, oestrous cycles have to be re-established and the cow has to regain the ability to conceive. Most of the losses due to disorders of the reproductive system are chronic –whilst some diseases such as metritis can be spectacular acute disorders, mild disorders such as endometritis and anoestrus are far more common and important. Metritis, which occurs between 4 and 14 days after calving, can be life-threatening and require urgent and vigorous treatment. Endometritis, which occurs after about 3 weeks from calving is common, and is a major cause of conception failure and anoestrus. The condition is relatively easily managed: and, fortunately, cephapirin, as a first-generation cephalosporin, is probably unlikely to be caught up in any restriction of such drugs for veterinary use. Anoestrus is the most important disorder of reproduction. It arises as an interaction between nutrition, the genetics of the cow, the interval between calving and the start of mating and the management of the cow over the period between the latter part of the last lactation and the start of mating. Hormonal treatment regimens (using various combinations of some or all of GnRH, PGF2α, progesterone and eCG) are moderately effective at treating anoestrous cows, but prevention of the disorder through good nutrition and stockmanship is the best long-term solution. High yielding cows are genetically prone to suboestrus, low conception rates and, possibly, uterine infections. They are also prone to disorders such as cystic ovarian disease. The management of high yielding cows, especially in systems that feed a high proportion of pasture forages, can be very challenging.

Speakers
avatar for Tim Parkinson

Tim Parkinson

Tim Parkinson is Professor of Farm Animal Reproduction & Health at Massey University, New Zealand. He graduated from Bristol University and initially worked in cattle practice and cattle AI in the UK. After his PhD in reproductive physiology at Nottingham University, he lectured in... Read More →


Wednesday May 16, 2018 8:00am - 9:00am
Plaza P1 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

8:30am

Veterinary attitudes to mandatory prepubertal desexing in the ACT
A survey of registered ACT veterinarians in 2017 examined the influence of veterinarian demographics, attitudinal differences to cats and dogs and fundamental beliefs towards pet overpopulation on likelihood to recommend and perform prepubertal desexing. It found veterinarian demographics had a significant affect on likelihood of performing prepubertal desexing. This presentation will discuss the research and explore the issues around mandatory prepubertal desexing as a policy.

Speakers

Wednesday May 16, 2018 8:30am - 9:00am
Plaza P2 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

8:30am

Investigating the impact and control of lungworm in lambs
High prevalence of lungworm induced pneumonia at slaughter prompted an on-farm epidemiological study. All three species of lungworm were found and a variety of intermediate hosts including two snails not previously recorded as hosts. The aim to compare the prevalence of lungworm larvae with respect to mollusc population density was rewarded, but the efficacy of two recommended treatments was found to be ineffective in at least one species of lungworm.

Speakers
avatar for Colin Trengove

Colin Trengove

Managing Director, Pro Ag Consulting
Colin is a 1979 Murdoch and 1989 Mackinnon Project graduate as well as Director of Pro Ag Consulting - a business set up in 1996 focussed on the nutrition of soil, plant and animal to achieve optimum livestock health and production. He is currently enrolled in a PhD examining the... Read More →


Wednesday May 16, 2018 8:30am - 9:00am
Plaza P3 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

9:00am

Control of scour worms in prime lambs in Western Australia
In Western Australia, a project quantified the potential loss of growth and value in prime lambs due to non-Haemonchus sp worm species. Observations from 2013 to 2015 were conducted on 14 properties throughout South-West Western Australia. The results suggest that best-practice worm control over the critical period for prime lamb growth should include: ensuring that growth rates are 240 grams per head per day or greater in the first 14 weeks after the start of lambing; conducting worm egg counts about 10 weeks after the start of lambing; weaning and giving an effective (>98%) drench shortly afterwards if the count is over 250 eggs per gram; and drench onto lower worm burden paddock. All of these practices would be cost effective given the significant economic value to be gained when prime lambs are slaughtered around 28 weeks after the start of lambing and they are also relatively easy to implement.

Speakers

Wednesday May 16, 2018 9:00am - 9:30am
Plaza P3 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

9:00am

Blood products and their uses
Blood transfusions save lives; however, unlike manufactured pharmaceuticals, they rely on blood donations from other animals. Component transfusion therapy ensures the most efficient usage of this precious resource. This talk will show attendees the different blood products which can be produced from a single blood donation, what products are available here in Australia, and which products are best used for what situations. We will also cover which animals would be considered for blood donor programs in-house.

Speakers
avatar for Karen Jackson

Karen Jackson

ASAV Committee, University of Queensland
I'm a clinical pathologist with a passion for haematology, immunohaematology, transfusion medicine, oncology, and education.


Wednesday May 16, 2018 9:00am - 10:00am
Great Hall Doors 1 and 8 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

9:00am

Back on their feet again: Management of endocrine laminitis
Once you have made a diagnosis of endocrinopathic laminitis, it is important to use that information to guide treatment of the acute laminitis episode as well as to guide long term management to prevent recurrence. However, not all endocrinopathic laminitis cases are lame and the importance of recognising sub clinical laminitis and the development of divergent hoof rings or other hoof capsular changes to enable preventive strategies to be implemented are emphasised. The aims of this presentation are to: 1. Discuss management of the acute case including managing the pain, providing hoof support and preventing further damage as well as immediate endocrine treatment considerations. The evidence for medical options beyond NSAIDs will be discussed. 2. Discuss management of the endocrine laminitis case after the acute episode, where the management focus is on the underlying cause, principally reduction of reduction of hyperinsulinaemia and improvement of insulin sensitivity using dietary management, exercise and medical therapy, depending on the case. 3. Provide case based examples of endocrinopathic laminitis management, including longer term management, pitfalls and difficulties that may be encountered. This includes consideration of the owner and their requirements – how to tailor your plan to ensure owner compliance and equine welfare.

Speakers
avatar for Cathy McGowan

Cathy McGowan

University of Liverpool
Cathy is Professor of Equine Internal Medicine, Head of Department, Equine Clinical Science at The University of Liverpool, Institute of Veterinary Science.Graduating from the University of Sydney (1991) she has aPhD in equine exercise physiology, RCVS and European Diplomas and recognised... Read More →


Wednesday May 16, 2018 9:00am - 10:00am
Mezzanine M1 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

9:00am

Regional nerve blocks in canine and feline dentistry
Dental procedures, such as teeth extractions and periodontal surgery, are considered to be invasive and painful surgeries. Providing pain management in human and veterinary dentistry is crucial for patient comfort. Moreover, blocking nociceptive input during the surgery also helps in preventing post-operative wind-up pain. Other than direct administration of systemic analgesic drugs, pain management in dentistry can be achieved through regional nerve blocks. Nerve blocks also increases anesthesia safety by significantly decreasing the dose of inhalant anesthetic agents needed; therefore, reducing any potential cardiovascular and respiratory depression effects during the anesthesia especially in long dental procedures. The aim of this presentation is to describe the different techniques of regional nerve blocks that are commonly used in canine and feline dentistry. Each technique will be discussed thoroughly and the required instrumentations, important anatomical landmarks, and potential complications will also be provided. Furthermore, this presentation will also describe different types of local anesthetic agents along with their side effects, duration of action, and onset of action.

Speakers
avatar for Williana Basuki

Williana Basuki

Practice Limited to Veterinary Dentistry, Tufts Veterinary Emergency Treatment and Specialties
Dr. Williana Basuki was born and grew up in Indonesia. She earned her veterinary degree at the University of Queensland in 2010. After university, she embarked on her journey as a small animal practitioner before entering a rotating internship followed by a surgery internship at Queensland... Read More →


Wednesday May 16, 2018 9:00am - 10:00am
Mezzanine M2 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

9:00am

Raising a sane dog: importance of optimal socialisation
Why is that period of socialization in dogs so important? How should we provide the optimal experience during the socialization period? Socialization is more than just meeting people, and sometimes doing too much or socialization incorrectly is detrimental.

Speakers
avatar for Theresa DePorter

Theresa DePorter

Oakland Veterinary Referral Services
Board Certified Veterinary Behaviourist at Oakland Veterinary Referral Services in metropolitan Detroit Michigan USA  Graduated from Purdue in 1992.  Diplomate in both the American College of Veterinary Behaviorists (ACVB) and European College of Animal Welfare and Behavioural Medicine... Read More →


Wednesday May 16, 2018 9:00am - 10:00am
Mezzanine M3 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

9:00am

Fix the little stuff that makes the big stuff happen...
We all know that goals need to be SMART, but I would argue that they also need to be small. Small enough to maintain focus and motivation, a series of little steps building towards a big goal. Telling the team they need to improve the customer experience is too big a goal to get a handle on. Identifying the small aspects of service that currently fall short allows everyone to feel ownership for the issue and see clearly what they need to do to fix things. Focusing on using the simple 5 Steps process for answering telephone calls is a great example of where the seemingly small focus on using the right words delivers the bigger aim of creating trust with the client. Measuring call-handling statistics might highlight that many inbound calls are lost, resulting in changes to equipment and rotas to handle more calls at busier times - a small change that makes a big difference.

Speakers
avatar for Alison Lambert

Alison Lambert

Managing Director, On Switch
A farmer's daughter from Yorkshire, Alison qualified from Liverpool University in 1989. She worked in practice for several years before pursuing a business career with Hills Pet Nutrition and MARS, where she discovered the passion for the customer experience that her award-winning... Read More →


Wednesday May 16, 2018 9:00am - 10:00am
Mezzanine M4 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

9:00am

A refresher on sperm morphology
Speakers

Wednesday May 16, 2018 9:00am - 10:00am
Plaza P1 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

9:00am

The influence of human factors on the effectiveness of stunning
 Mechanical stunning (for example, non-penetrating percussive stunning and penetrative captive bolt) is used widely in Australian abattoirs and overseas and when correctly executed, it induces a state of concussion during which the animal is unconscious. Human factors is the scientific discipline concerned with the understanding of interaction of humans and other elements of a system. Human factors have been shown to have an impact on the effectiveness of stunning and can be further influenced by the design of the facilities and equipment. An understanding of the factors that influence the stunning outcome will help to determine optimum conditions for the use of mechanical stunning in Australian establishments.


Speakers

Wednesday May 16, 2018 9:00am - 10:00am
Plaza P2 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

9:30am

A diagnostic and geographic analysis of liver fluke in South Eastern Australia
Liver fluke (Fasciola hepatica) are a parasite of many species including cattle, sheep, goats, alpacas and horses, as well as humans and wild animals. Liver fluke occurs in regions with aquatic environments, shallow and slow moving streams, dam overflows, springs and areas of slow seepage. Fluke require a suitable habitat for the primary intermediate snail host (Austropeplea tomentosa) and conditions suitable for the free-swimming larval stage. Snails are limited to higher rainfall (>600mm/year) areas of NSW (eastern), south eastern Queensland, Victoria, Tasmania and south eastern South Australia and irrigation areas. Awareness of the geographical distribution of liver fluke enables better management of the disease, highlighting ‘hot’ spots in Australia. Analysis of laboratory submission data with a digital spatial software program allows visual analysis, integrating data with maps. Monitoring of liver fluke is conducted predominately by fluke egg counts or to a lesser extent with more recently developed technologies such as Elisa-antibody or copro-antigens. Our diagnostic laboratory has conducted liver fluke egg counts (LFECs) for more than 25 years and with the development of an electronic database in 1998 a large and valuable data set has developed. To date, there are over 4,000 submissions for liver fluke testing on the database, allowing analysis of geographical distribution of liver fluke, potential resistance to treatment and changes over time related to increased awareness/education of potential production loss. Geographical Information Systems (GIS) software such as ArcGIS allow visualisation and analysis of geographically registered data (ie data accompanied by location coordinates). This presentation will summarise our findings from detailed analysis of the laboratory database.

Speakers
MC

Michael Chambers

Invetus Proprietary Limited


Wednesday May 16, 2018 9:30am - 10:00am
Plaza P3 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

10:30am

Emerging diseases in Australian marine wildlife
For centuries Australia has been isolated form the rest of the world by a large distance and this has allowed it to remain free from a number of infectious diseases. Additionally, Australia has a large coastline with a relatively small population which has allowed the marine environment to remain relatively pristine and free of contaminants. In the last few decades, however, international travel and trade have increased bringing with it an increased risk of infectious diseases entering the country. In the same period industries such as mining and oil and gas have prospered leading to contamination of the marine environment. Global warming may be playing a part in the emergence of infectious diseases in Australian marine animals as it may alter the environment enough to make animals more susceptible to contracting these diseases. Diseases that have emerged over the last 20-30 years in Australian marine animals include cetacean morbillivirus, coccidiosis in green turtles (Chelonia mydas), toxoplasmosis, Streptococcus agalactiae and brucellosis.

Speakers
avatar for David Blyde

David Blyde

Veternarian, Sea World
Dr David Blyde is the veterinarian at Sea World, Gold Coast, Australia since 2001. David graduated from the University of Sydney in 1982 with a BVSc (second class honours) He worked as a clinical veterinarian at Taronga Zoo, Sydney  and then Western Plains Zoo, Dubbo from 1988... Read More →


Wednesday May 16, 2018 10:30am - 11:00am
Mezzanine M2 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

10:30am

Are you what you eat? Herbal medicine and the microbiome
Herbal medicine emerged from the co-evolution of animals, plants and microorganisms. The relationship between the gastrointestinal tract and health has been recognised by traditional medical systems for thousands of years. Western herbal medicine acknowledges the significance of the extensive innervation of the gastrointestinal tract and the relationship between the gut and central nervous system by calling the gut the 'second brain'. Research confirms the importance of the gut microbiome and the impact of dysbiosis on the immune, central nervous and cardiovascular systems. Many plant constituents require metabolism by the gut microbiome to form active secondary metabolites which are absorbed across the gut wall. Diet, especially soluble and insoluble fibre intake may be adjusted to modify the gut microbiome.

Speakers
MK

Megan Kearney

Dr Megan Kearney is an integrative veterinary surgeon and Medical Herbalist. She runs a veterinary hospital and practice for people in Bangalow, Northern NSW. She sees a wide range of species including companion animals, horses, livestock, exotics and wildlife. Megan was inspired... Read More →


Wednesday May 16, 2018 10:30am - 11:00am
Plaza P2 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

10:30am

Diagnosing Anthelmintic Resistance in small ruminants: Problems and solutions
Small ruminant producers in Australia require effective anthelmintics to ensure good welfare and productivity. However, common gastrointestinal nematodes have developed resistance to most anthelmintics, resulting in variable efficacy and frequent ‘drench failure’. Due to high cost and inconvenience of conventional tests, which require 15 animals per test group and a starting worm egg count of 300 eggs per gram (epg), most producers do not know the efficacy of the drenches they are using. One solution is to use more sensitive egg count methods such as Mini-FLOTAC, which has a higher egg recovery than previous methods and a sensitivity of 5 epg. Another is to pool samples for composite testing. Further, some producers will use cloud-based devices such as FECPAKG2, which allow a rapid, cheap and repeatable assessment of worm egg counts. Novel protocols based on these methods allow small ruminant veterinarians to quickly and cheaply diagnose anthelmintic resistance.

Speakers

Wednesday May 16, 2018 10:30am - 11:00am
Plaza P3 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

10:30am

Diagnosis and Treatment of Immune-Mediated Polyarthritis
Diagnosis and treatment of immune-mediated polyarthritis in dogs and cats, with an emphasis on common presentations and a rational diagnostic approach including history, physical examination, routine blood testing, radiography, joint taps, and screening for underlying disease.

Speakers
avatar for Andrew Mackin

Andrew Mackin

Head, Department of Clinical Sciences, Mississippi State University
Andrew Mackin is Professor and Head of the Department of Clinical Sciences at the Mississippi State University College of Veterinary Medicine. After graduating from Murdoch University he completed an internship and residency in small animal medicine at the University of Melbourne... Read More →


Wednesday May 16, 2018 10:30am - 11:30am
Great Hall Doors 1 and 8 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

10:30am

Navicular Disease diagnosis and treatment
Speakers
BD

Brad Dowling

Townsville Vet Clinic


Wednesday May 16, 2018 10:30am - 11:30am
Mezzanine M1 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

10:30am

Managing the behaviour of dogs and cats to improve their welfare
Gone are the days when the use of physical and / or psychological punishment to manage “undesirable” behaviours of dogs and cats is something that is acceptable to most of the community. Now understanding why dogs and cats do what they do is what owners not only want, but need, to know. The 3 M plus 1 approach is now used to manage the behaviour of pets that owners wish to modify. All four aspects need to be addressed in order to improve their welfare. Most importantly punishment, whether physical or psychological, does not improve the animal’s welfare. There are better ways to manage dog and cat behaviour to help them live in harmony with their owners. The pros and cons of managing behaviour using reward and / or punishment based methods will be discussed.

Speakers
KS

Kersti Seksel

Sydney Animal Behaviour Service
After graduating from Sydney University as a veterinarian Kersti completed a BA in Behavioural Sciences and a MA (Hons). She is a Fellow of the Australian and New Zealand College of Veterinary Scientists, a Diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Behaviorists and a Diplomate... Read More →


Wednesday May 16, 2018 10:30am - 11:30am
Mezzanine M3 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

10:30am

Obstetrics - It's all in the delivery
During normal parturition, it has been estimated that an average force of approximately 70 kg is required to deliver a bovine fetus. Approximately 40 percent of this pressure is supplied by uterine contractions and 60 percent by the abdominal press. The force required to fracture the leg of a calf varies with its weight. When traction is applied to the dorsal surface of a limb with an obstetric chain around the pastern, a mean force of 170 kg is required to fracture the leg. The mean force that can be generated by veterinary students is close to 180 kg, with strong individuals able to apply as much as 200 kg of force. A mechanical fetal extractor can apply approximately 400 kg of force while a tractor may apply greater than 5000 kg. The obstetrician must determine if vaginal delivery is likely to be possible without endangering the dam or the fetus. Come along to see how this can be determined.

Speakers

Wednesday May 16, 2018 10:30am - 11:30am
Plaza P1 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

10:30am

The Hub
Do you have a burning question that you would like to ask an industry leader that you haven't had a chance to do yet? Come to the HUB and ask your questions in small informal group discussions. You get to learn from each other and our leaders Topics ranging from per insurance to HR, marketing and how to deal with 'millennials'. Check out the VBG facebook page and the VBG room at the conference for topics.

Wednesday May 16, 2018 10:30am - 12:30pm
Mezzanine M4 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

11:00am

Turtle Trials and Tribulations
JCU Turtle Health Research brings together academics, postgraduate students and volunteers who share an unwavering passion for the health and wellbeing of turtles in the tropics. Our mission is to understand and conserve sea turtles for future generations with specific focus on health and disease processes. One way to answer some of our research questions and establish baseline health parameters is to look at healthy turtles of all ages. This is why we have a purpose-built facility that caters for the special needs of hatchling turtles, whilst enabling us to study their early immune development. We have fondly named this facility ‘The Caraplace’. While many of our projects have a field component, there are also long hours spent in the laboratory analysing samples. This presentation will cover some of the more recent findings from projects concerned with freshwater and seawater turtle health. • Bacterial gut communities of healthy and compromised green turtles (Chelonia mydas). • Antibiotic resistant bacterial isolates from captive green sea turtles and In Vitro sensitivity to bacteriophages. • Epidemiology of fibropapillomatosis in green sea turtles (Chelonia mydas). • Presence and impact of viruses in green turtles (Chelonia mydas) from the Northern Great Barrier Reef. • Do green turtle hatchlings (Chelonia mydas) have a favourite colour? • An unusual mortality event in Johnstone River snapping turtles Elseya irwini (Johnstone) in Far North Queensland • Ingestion of microplastic debris by green sea turtles (Chelonia mydas): Validation of a sequential extraction protocol

Speakers
EA

Ellen Ariel

James Cook University
Dr Ariel is Associate Professor in virology and coordinator of the Aquatic Animal Health group at James Cook University. After completing a PhD in Aquatic Pathobiology, Dr Ariel worked for the European Commission as Coordinator of the 25 National Reference Laboratories for Fish Diseases... Read More →


Wednesday May 16, 2018 11:00am - 11:30am
Mezzanine M2 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

11:00am

Why use herbs in practice?
Medicinal plants are composed of phytochemical constituents with varied phytochemistry and physiological actions with many such plants having significant antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-neoplastic, anti-fibrotic and circulation improving properties. There are clear examples where their potential for preventing, modifying and delaying chronic disease in small animals can be exploited. This session will describe the potential therapeutic role of medicinal plants in the treatment of chronic disease in small animals such as degenerative myelopathy, hyperadrenocorticism, and congestive heart failure.

Speakers
BF

Barbara Fougere

College Integrative Veterinary Therapies
Dr Barbara Fougere graduated from Murdoch in 1986. She has post graduate qualifications in Integrative medicine and practices at All Natural Vet Care in Sydney and teaches for the College of Integrative Veterinary Therapies internationally. She is a Past President of the International... Read More →


Wednesday May 16, 2018 11:00am - 11:30am
Plaza P2 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

11:00am

An update on FECRT methodology and efficacy calculations
Diagnosis of drench resistance in the field still depends primarily on the Faecal Egg Count Reduction Test (FECRT) methodology, despite considerable research aimed at developing faster and more streamlined tests. Treatment efficacy has traditionally been calculated using either arithmetic or geometric group mean egg counts to develop a single (point) estimate of the efficacy- >95% in faecal egg counts (FECs) indicates susceptibility,

Speakers
MC

Michael Chambers

Invetus Proprietary Limited


Wednesday May 16, 2018 11:00am - 11:30am
Plaza P3 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

11:30am

Crocodiles in northern Australia: sustainable conservation initiatives
The estuarine crocodile (Crocodylus porosus) is the largest living reptile in the world. Estuarine crocodiles range across northern Australia from south of Broome in WA, across the northern coastline and as far south as Rockhampton in Queensland, including estuaries and river systems throughout its range, often extending several hundred kilometres inland. They occur extra limitally through PNG and Indo-China. They were hunted extensively for their skins from 1940s to 1970s when they were protected across all three states. C. porosus skins are the most highly valued crocodilian skins in the fashion trade. Since farming practices commenced, the wild populations have started to recover, bringing the animals into conflict with livestock producers, locals and tourists. Intensive farming, ranching and wild harvesting are practiced in Australia. The relative merits and conservation impacts of each method are discussed. The concept of a universal approach to sustainable crocodile management practices is proposed.

Speakers
avatar for Annabelle Olsson

Annabelle Olsson

Principal, Boongarry Vet Surgery
I am a wildlife, avian, reptile and exotics vet based in Cairns, but with a practice which extends throughout Cape York. I have research degrees in health of free living flying foxes, and anaesthesia in crocodiles. I am President of the Wildlife Conservancy of tropical Queensland... Read More →


Wednesday May 16, 2018 11:30am - 12:00pm
Mezzanine M2 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

11:30am

A review of helminth infections in alpacas
This paper will present a review on helminth infection in South American Camelids. Domesticated alpacas and llamas can be infected with a range of nematodes, cestodes and flukes; however, their susceptibility to these worms is variable. Currently, no dewormer is registered for its use in alpacas and anthelmintic resistance in gastrointestinal nematodes of alpacas has been reported from Australia and other parts of the world.

Speakers
AJ

Abdul Jabbar

Associate Professor in Veterinary Parasitology, University of Melbourne


Wednesday May 16, 2018 11:30am - 12:00pm
Plaza P3 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

11:30am

Fever of Unknown Origin
Practical approach to challenging fever of unknown origin cases in dogs and cats, with an emphasis on a rational, structured, step-by-step approach beginning with inexpensive tests like history, physical examination, bloodwork and imaging, and building up to more extensive testing only if needed.

Speakers
avatar for Andrew Mackin

Andrew Mackin

Head, Department of Clinical Sciences, Mississippi State University
Andrew Mackin is Professor and Head of the Department of Clinical Sciences at the Mississippi State University College of Veterinary Medicine. After graduating from Murdoch University he completed an internship and residency in small animal medicine at the University of Melbourne... Read More →


Wednesday May 16, 2018 11:30am - 12:30pm
Great Hall Doors 1 and 8 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

11:30am

Tendinopathies diagnosis and treatment
Speakers
BD

Brad Dowling

Townsville Vet Clinic


Wednesday May 16, 2018 11:30am - 12:30pm
Mezzanine M1 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

11:30am

Just because it works doesn't mean it's right: The ethics of training animals
Animal training whether for management, performance or behavioural modification, often involves intense interactions between human and animal and poses some interesting welfare and ethical challenges and resulting discussions. There is often a misunderstanding or poor application of learning theory and confusion over terminology (eg positive vs negative reinforcement), which can impact on the animal’s training experience. Training involves the manipulation of an animal’s behaviour and emotions, through the application of methods that rely on the animal’s ability to learn and to remember. It stands to reason that methods/equipment used for training animals based on provoking negative emotions such as fear or pain, which may lead to short term successes, will also most likely lead to the development of behavioural responses and fear memories that are not desirable for animal and human safety in the long term. There is a plethora of equipment and training practices that are commonly used, such as choke, anti-bark and electric collars for dogs, whips and spurs for horses, dominance training techniques, and owners are often unaware of the potential problems these can cause for them and their pet. Ethical and effective animal training relies on the handler/trainer having a good knowledge of the animal’s ethology, its individual motivation, how learning theory works, recognition of mild signs of stress/pain as well as setting realistic goals for an individual and a training session. Training should be a positive experience for an animal in order for it to learn effectively, and the trainer should at the very least adopt the ethical approach of ‘doing no harm’ during their interactions with the animal.

Speakers
avatar for Nat Waran

Nat Waran

Executive Dean and Professor (One Welfare), Eastern Institute of Technology, Te Aho a Māui
Nat gained a first class Zoology degree from Glasgow University, and PhD from Cambridge University’s Veterinary School funded by the British Veterinary Association. She joined Edinburgh University in 1990 to develop a unique PG Masters in the relatively new area of Applied Animal... Read More →


Wednesday May 16, 2018 11:30am - 12:30pm
Mezzanine M3 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

11:30am

Minor procedures – Tips and Techniques
Do you want hot tips with that? Add some hot tips with sauce to your general veterinary procedures. Consider the benefits of a Utrecht suture pattern for uterine closure in a bovine caesarean…can it be used in a dog?...sure thing. What is needed to complete a pudendal nerve block…and what does it block? Check out the Cornell detorsion rod. Where is the dorsal apical ligament and what is it used for? You’re putting that poly-pipe where? How to get the most out of your Buhner suture. What guide can be used to arrive at a prognosis for a penile haematoma? How much epidural did you give? All this and more in this down-to-Earth session.

Speakers

Wednesday May 16, 2018 11:30am - 12:30pm
Plaza P1 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

11:30am

Nutrition: Functional Foods and Nutrigenomics
Wholesome nutrition is the key to maintaining a healthy immune system and resistance to disease. Commercial foods ingested by animals on a regular basis may not be balanced in terms of major nutrients, minerals and vitamins, and some continue to add chemicals to the final product to enhance its stability and shelf-life. Nutritional deficiencies or imbalances as well as exposures to various chemicals, drugs and toxins present a continual immunological challenge which can suppress immune function, especially in those animals genetically susceptible to immune dysfunction (immune deficiency, autoimmunity, allergies). Genetic differences between individuals lead to quantitative variations in dietary requirements for energy and nutrient needs, and to maintain health. Also, genetic defects may result in inborn errors of metabolism that affect one or more pathways involving nutrients or their metabolites. While minimal and maximal nutrient requirements have been established for most vitamins and trace mineral elements, optimum amounts for every individual cannot be assumed. The exciting new field of nutrigenomics is an emerging science that studies the molecular relationships between nutrition and the response of genes in promoting health. Different diets elicit varying patterns of gene and protein expression as well as metabolite production; these are termed molecular dietary signatures. New diagnostics for detecting food sensitivities and intolerance are now available using saliva, instead of serum or feces.

Speakers
avatar for Jean Dodds

Jean Dodds

Hemopet
W. Jean Dodds, DVM graduated in 1964 from the Ontario Veterinary College, Canada. She has 5 decades of veterinary clinical and diagnostic research, over 150 publications, and membership in national and international committees. Hemopet, her non-profit national animal blood bank was... Read More →


Wednesday May 16, 2018 11:30am - 12:30pm
Plaza P2 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

12:00pm

Crocodile sustainable harvest for conservation in western Cape York
The estuarine crocodile (Crocodylus porosus) is the largest living reptile in the world. Estuarine crocodiles range across northern Australia from south of Broome in WA, across the northern coastline and as far south as Rockhampton in Queensland, including estuaries and river systems throughout its range, often extending several hundred kilometres inland. They occur extra limitally through PNG and Indo-China. They were hunted extensively for their skins from 1940s to 1970s when they were protected across all three states. C. porosus skins are the most highly valued crocodilian skins in the fashion trade. Since farming practices commenced, the wild populations have started to recover, bringing the animals into conflict with livestock producers, locals and tourists. Intensive farming, ranching and wild harvesting are practiced in Australia. The relative merits and conservation impacts of each method are discussed. The concept of a universal approach to sustainable crocodile management practices is proposed.

Speakers
avatar for Annabelle Olsson

Annabelle Olsson

Principal, Boongarry Vet Surgery
I am a wildlife, avian, reptile and exotics vet based in Cairns, but with a practice which extends throughout Cape York. I have research degrees in health of free living flying foxes, and anaesthesia in crocodiles. I am President of the Wildlife Conservancy of tropical Queensland... Read More →


Wednesday May 16, 2018 12:00pm - 12:30pm
Mezzanine M2 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

12:00pm

Gastrointestinal nematodes of alpacas in Australia
Australian alpaca population has been growing substantially since alpacas were introduced into the country. Like other ruminants, parasitism is a major health concern for alpacas. Moreover, alpacas harbour shared-gastrointestinal nematodes (shared-GINs) and thus they can be source of resistant GINs for sheep, goat and cattle. Very little is known about the prevalence of GINs, control practices and efficacy of commonly used anthelmintics in alpacas. This study was conducted recently in Australian alpacas. An online questionnaire survey was administered to assess the current worm control practices used by Australian alpaca farmers. Faecal samples were collected and analysed using faecal egg counts and larval cultures. Adult worms were also recovered from alpaca guts, counted and examined to determine the worm burdens and their spectrum. Finally, the efficacy of commonly used anthelmintics was assessed by faecal egg count reduction test. Results show that shared-GINs are prevalent in Australian alpacas and they are resistant to most widely used anthelmintics.

Speakers

Wednesday May 16, 2018 12:00pm - 12:30pm
Plaza P3 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

12:30pm

Plenary - The science of high performance thinking: Thrive by design
Speakers
avatar for Jennifer Brockis

Jennifer Brockis

Dr Jenny Brockis specialises in high-performance thinking. An expert in brain fitness and long fascinated by the brain and human behaviour, Dr Jenny reveals how to cultivate the mental agility, flexibility and adaptability required to meet the needs of the modern workplace, and thrive... Read More →


Wednesday May 16, 2018 12:30pm - 1:30pm
Great Hall Doors 1 and 8 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

2:30pm

Healing the healers: the challenge of self-care
Many articles have been published on the psychological health, workplace stress, burnout and suicide of veterinarians. Veterinarians are exposed to episodic acute stress and chronic stress while working in a highly emotional environment. Factors that affect one's susceptibility to stress include relationships, living environment, financial position, work, lifestyle and self-awareness. Chronic stress can have a negative impact on one's physical, cognitive, emotional and behavioural health. However, research suggests that your thoughts and actions can transform your experience of stress. Those who choose to view their stress response as helpful can develop greater resilience. Personal strategies to transform stress include practising mindfulness, developing an awareness of emotional triggers and warning signs and committing to self-care. Strategies for managing stress in the workplace include creating a culture which acknowledges that stress is a normal part of working life, taking personal responsibility for thoughts, emotions and behaviour, asking for help and celebrating when things go well.

Speakers
MK

Megan Kearney

Dr Megan Kearney is an integrative veterinary surgeon and Medical Herbalist. She runs a veterinary hospital and practice for people in Bangalow, Northern NSW. She sees a wide range of species including companion animals, horses, livestock, exotics and wildlife. Megan was inspired... Read More →


Wednesday May 16, 2018 2:30pm - 3:00pm
Plaza P2 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

2:30pm

To close your eyes does not ease another's pain: the problem with assessing pain
Speakers
avatar for Nat Waran

Nat Waran

Executive Dean and Professor (One Welfare), Eastern Institute of Technology, Te Aho a Māui
Nat gained a first class Zoology degree from Glasgow University, and PhD from Cambridge University’s Veterinary School funded by the British Veterinary Association. She joined Edinburgh University in 1990 to develop a unique PG Masters in the relatively new area of Applied Animal... Read More →


Wednesday May 16, 2018 2:30pm - 3:30pm
Great Hall Doors 1 and 8 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

2:30pm

Techniques for Regional Antimicrobial delivery in Clinical Practice
Speakers
BD

Brad Dowling

Townsville Vet Clinic


Wednesday May 16, 2018 2:30pm - 3:30pm
Mezzanine M1 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

2:30pm

Taking the fear out of fish medicine
Fish diagnosis and medical or surgical treatment is often feared by the general practitioner. The aim of this paper is to provide a basic guide to examination and diagnostic procedure for the vet who sees fish occasionally, but lacks confidence in approaching the fish consultation. It discusses the use of existing equipment within the clinic to assist with fish diagnostics and surgery. Case studies of common and not so common aquatic species are presented to illustrate how a good history, a basic physical examination and simple sampling of skin lesions and gill biopsies can lead to diagnosis of commonly occurring problems in aquarium fish. The discussion includes basic information to collect from owners regarding husbandry and water quality management, as well as a brief overview of piscine anatomy and physiology as it relates to the physical examination and the manifestation of disease. Anaesthesia for the general practitioner is also discussed for restraint or small surgical procedures. Some common diseases are discussed. Case studies include skin disease, gastro-intestinal obstruction and minor surgery.

Speakers
avatar for Annabelle Olsson

Annabelle Olsson

Principal, Boongarry Vet Surgery
I am a wildlife, avian, reptile and exotics vet based in Cairns, but with a practice which extends throughout Cape York. I have research degrees in health of free living flying foxes, and anaesthesia in crocodiles. I am President of the Wildlife Conservancy of tropical Queensland... Read More →


Wednesday May 16, 2018 2:30pm - 3:30pm
Mezzanine M2 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

2:30pm

Anaesthesia free dentistry: two views, one issue
Anaesthesia free dentistry is a relatively new and increasing trend in small animal practice. There are a number of reasons why consumers are seeking this practice, principally believing that they are improving the welfare of their pet. Both the oral and mental health of our patients is affected by the practice. The presidents of the behavioural and dental special interest groups will share their views, and invite you to share yours on this emerging area.

Speakers
avatar for Tara Cashman

Tara Cashman

veterinarian, Eurocoast Veterinary Centre
Tara Cashman graduated from Sydney Uni in 1995 and worked in mixed practice for 2 years before returning to complete a mixed practice internship in 1998. After a brief working holiday to the UK she returned to Australia and became a partner in a NSW practice where she still works... Read More →
JL

Jacqui Ley

VBSA/MVSC
Registered Specialist in Veterinary Behavioural Medicine. Owner of Veterinary Behaviour Services Australia and sees cases at the Melbourne Veterinary Specialist Centre in Melbourne. Interest in the mental health of all species and the diagnosis and treatment of mental health diso... Read More →


Wednesday May 16, 2018 2:30pm - 3:30pm
Mezzanine M3 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

2:30pm

Panel Discussion: Technology, what’s emerging and where are we headed
Keeping up to date with technology in 2018 is almost a full-time role in itself. The veterinary Business Group brings together a panel of experts in their fields, to share new developments that consider concepts for veterinary business into the future.

Wednesday May 16, 2018 2:30pm - 3:30pm
Mezzanine M4 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

2:30pm

Emergency Animal Disease: Are we adequately prepared?
In the presentation, it is intended to discuss issues with the audience including: the role and training of private practitioners in disease identification and local disease management; veterinary para-professionals and emergency services; veterinary laboratories; disease notification; VDs eDECs and eNVDs; farm auditing and LPA; and tracking livestock trucks. It will be proposed that Government and Industry need to increase funding for EAD preparedness just as a country needs to train an army before the war. There will be discussion as to the requirement for government and industry put an additional $50million into EAD preparedness to mitigate a $50billion risk?

Speakers

Wednesday May 16, 2018 2:30pm - 3:30pm
Plaza P1 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

2:30pm

One Health - Training at the coal face
VBB's clinical training and public awareness programs have been designed to improve animal and human health worldwide - and facilitate emergency response.

Speakers
MD

Maryann Dalton

Chief Executive Officer, Vets Beyond Borders


Wednesday May 16, 2018 2:30pm - 3:30pm
Plaza P3 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

3:00pm

Building resilience
Research shows that those who care for others, out of vocation or compulsion, often have difficulties in caring for themselves. It’s is easy to get caught up in the day to day operations of clinical practice and forget about taking care of our head and heart. This session focuses on a simple strategy to enhance your mental wellness, help prevent stress related disease and take better care of you to enable you to enjoy practice without burning out. You will learn a quick and easy technique you can use at work to build resilience and reduce stress.

Speakers
BF

Barbara Fougere

College Integrative Veterinary Therapies
Dr Barbara Fougere graduated from Murdoch in 1986. She has post graduate qualifications in Integrative medicine and practices at All Natural Vet Care in Sydney and teaches for the College of Integrative Veterinary Therapies internationally. She is a Past President of the International... Read More →


Wednesday May 16, 2018 3:00pm - 3:30pm
Plaza P2 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

4:00pm

Research priorities for GPs and veterinarians with respect to zoonoses
The paradigm of One Health seeks to break down silos with the aim of improving health and environmental outcomes for all species and the world. Zoonoses and emerging infectious diseases (EIDs) are a major focus of this movement. GPs and veterinarians may be (and often are) the ‘first line’ responders when it comes to recognising, diagnosing, referring and/or managing such diseases, either at an individual level or in the face of a potential outbreak. Are GPs and veterinarians prepared for these challenges? We asked ‘One Health experts’ from both veterinary and non-veterinary backgrounds to give us their opinions regarding research priorities for a proposed survey of Australian GPs and veterinarians regarding knowledge, attitudes and practices with respect to zoonoses and EIDs. This presentation will explore the findings of this Delphi Survey, examining what overall priorities were determined as well as differences in opinions between veterinary and non-veterinary participants. The eventual goal is to design and evaluate a targeted educational intervention to address knowledge deficits and hopefully explore pathways to facilitate more cross professional collaboration.

Speakers
SS

Sandra Steele

PhD student, University of Sydney
Sandra Steele has worked for many years as a small animal practitioner in Sydney and has always had an interest in zoonoses education and prevention. As a result of mid-career frustration, she went back to uni and completed a Master of Public Health in 2014, part of which was a self-directed... Read More →


Wednesday May 16, 2018 4:00pm - 4:30pm
Plaza P3 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

4:00pm

Practical blood transfusions in the dog
Practical approach to blood transfusions in the dog, with an emphasis on what can be managed safely and effectively in general practice.

Speakers
avatar for Andrew Mackin

Andrew Mackin

Head, Department of Clinical Sciences, Mississippi State University
Andrew Mackin is Professor and Head of the Department of Clinical Sciences at the Mississippi State University College of Veterinary Medicine. After graduating from Murdoch University he completed an internship and residency in small animal medicine at the University of Melbourne... Read More →


Wednesday May 16, 2018 4:00pm - 5:00pm
Great Hall Doors 1 and 8 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

4:00pm

Hoof capsule distortion and it's effect on Internal Structures
We know how the hoof capsule functions best when it is ‘normal’. Our perceptions of ‘normal’ may vary but we have some very solid parameters to base our assessment on. We also know that hoof capsules were designed to function optimally when they are ‘short’, wear should equal growth. Excess growth in various external hoof capsule structures creates abnormal leverage which in turn leads to distortion. I hope to show how our management practices, the environment that the horses are kept in and their limb conformation influences their hoof capsules. Different equine limb conformation defects/deviations create abnormal landing/loading patterns that influence the deformable hoof capsule and set up the foot for distortion/deviation. All of this influences the soft tissues inside the hoof capsule and proximal to the foot, abnormal stresses/loads placed upon these structures can pre dispose them to acute/chronic lesions. Using various trimming/shoeing techniques we can try to minimise hoof capsules distortion and increase the horse’s long term viability as an equine athlete.

Speakers

Wednesday May 16, 2018 4:00pm - 5:00pm
Mezzanine M1 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

4:00pm

Tools of the trade: what equipment do I need?
Do you consider yourself as a “dental-enthusiast” at your practice who wants to know more about the appropriate armamentarium for your dental work? Or are you that lucky (or unlucky) clinician who gets all the dental procedures at your practice and feels the pressure to know? If the answer is “yes” (or even if the answer is “no”), this presentation will be serve as a guideline in selecting the armamentarium for the most common dental procedures in small animal veterinary practices. The fundamentals of dental equipment and instruments which includes dental units, dental radiographs, hand instruments, oral surgery, suture materials, and restorative materials will be covered along with a brief discussion on instrument sharpening. We will also discuss the appropriate instrumentation techniques to perform the dental procedures ergonomically to reduce fatigue and excessive strains. Please note that the presentation will not promote any particular brands or manufacturing company.

Speakers
avatar for Williana Basuki

Williana Basuki

Practice Limited to Veterinary Dentistry, Tufts Veterinary Emergency Treatment and Specialties
Dr. Williana Basuki was born and grew up in Indonesia. She earned her veterinary degree at the University of Queensland in 2010. After university, she embarked on her journey as a small animal practitioner before entering a rotating internship followed by a surgery internship at Queensland... Read More →


Wednesday May 16, 2018 4:00pm - 5:00pm
Mezzanine M2 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

4:00pm

Anxiety and Epilepsy: An Update
Anxiety and Epilepsy often co-occur but there is confusion about treating anxiety disorders in patients with epilepsy. It is essential for the welfare of patients to treat their anxiety and it can be done safely with psychotropic medications.

Speakers
JL

Jacqui Ley

VBSA/MVSC
Registered Specialist in Veterinary Behavioural Medicine. Owner of Veterinary Behaviour Services Australia and sees cases at the Melbourne Veterinary Specialist Centre in Melbourne. Interest in the mental health of all species and the diagnosis and treatment of mental health diso... Read More →


Wednesday May 16, 2018 4:00pm - 5:00pm
Mezzanine M3 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

4:00pm

Effects of human behaviour on welfare and productivity outcomes for livestock
In intensive livestock production, frequent interactions occur between humans and animals. The principle that supervising and managing animals affects farm animal welfare is widely recognised within the livestock industries. However, some aspects of the way in which the stockperson affects animal welfare, both directly and indirectly, is probably not fully appreciated. Although the duration of contact between farm animals and their caretakers may be short, there is evidence that these interactions can significantly affect pig welfare and productivity. Further, together with the opportunity to perform their tasks well, stockpeople require a range of well-developed husbandry skills and knowledge to effectively care for and manage farm animals. Data from the livestock industries has been used to develop a model of the sequential relationships between farmers attitudes, their behaviour towards their animals and the effects on productivity and welfare of the animals.

Speakers
GC

Grahame Coleman

University of Melbourne


Wednesday May 16, 2018 4:00pm - 5:00pm
Plaza P1 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

4:00pm

Practice Management: Connecting all the dots
Practice managers are often the glue that pulls everything together from practice owners' expectations to that of the vets, animals, team and clients. Join us for the facilitated open discussion exclusively for senior nurses, practice and business managers.

Wednesday May 16, 2018 4:00pm - 6:00pm
Mezzanine M4 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

4:00pm

Resilience Workshop
Developing protective thinking and practices for a healthy veterinary career.

Speakers

Wednesday May 16, 2018 4:00pm - 6:00pm
Plaza P2 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

4:30pm

Q fever: validation of serological tests for Coxiella burnetii exposure in Australian cattle
Speakers

Wednesday May 16, 2018 4:30pm - 5:00pm
Plaza P3 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

5:00pm

Raw chicken consumption, campylobacter infection and acute polyradiculoneuritis in dogs
Acute polyradiculoneuritis (APN), also known as ‘Coonhound paralysis’, is an immune-mediated peripheral nerve disorder in dogs similar to Guillain-Barré syndrome in humans. Little information is available concerning the relationship between APN and Campylobacter spp. in dogs.

We estimated the association between Campylobacter spp. infection and APN and additional potential risks factors, particularly consumption of raw chicken in 27 dogs suffering from suspected APN and 47 healthy dogs. Faecal samples were collected from each enrolled animal to perform direct culture, DNA extraction and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for detection of Campylobacter spp. Data were obtained from the medical records and owner questionnaires in both groups.

In cases in which the faecal sample was collected within 7 days from onset of clinical signs, APN cases were 9.4 times more likely to be positive for Campylobacter spp compared to control dogs (P

Speakers
SF

Simon Firestone

University of Melbourne
Simon Firestone is a lecturer in Veterinary Epidemiology and Public Health at the University of Melbourne. He graduated from Veterinary Science at Melbourne in 2000, worked for four years in mixed and small animal practice, then trained as a public health epidemiologist developing... Read More →


Wednesday May 16, 2018 5:00pm - 5:30pm
Plaza P3 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

5:00pm

How to monitor dogs on Ïmmune-suppressive drugs - Anything new?
Currently dogs treated with immune suppressive drugs are monitored using a combination of response to treatment as well as monitoring for adverse effects. In this lecture, we will review commonly used immune suppressive drugs including prednisolone, cyclosporine, azathioprine, mycophenolate, and leflunomide. We will discuss their mode of action as well as adverse effects. We will also discuss the type of monitoring and at what frequency need to be considered for each drug. Finally, we will discuss newer tests that are being developed to assess the effect of cyclosporine in a given animal. Such a strategy has the potential to be used to finely tune the amount of drug that is needed to achieve individualized therapy. At the end of this lecture, you should: 1. Know the dosage and adverse effects of commonly used immune suppressive drugs. 2. Be comfortable to outline a monitoring plan when using a given immune suppressive drug. 3. Be aware of the main adverse effects of each drug to inform your client.

Speakers
JD

Julien Dandrieux

Univeristy of Melbourne
Julien graduated in 2002 from the University of Bern in Switzerland. He did a rotating internship in the same institution, followed by his medicine residency, which was a joint program between the University of Bern and Louisiana State University. Julien then worked as a clinician... Read More →


Wednesday May 16, 2018 5:00pm - 6:00pm
Great Hall Doors 1 and 8 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

5:00pm

Applying support and reducing stresses in the Acute/Chronic laminitic hoof
From a farriers point of view a laminitic horse has a more ‘mobile’ pedal bone inside its hoof capsule. Certain factors (distal descent of the pedal bone through the weight of the horse, the pull of the deep flexor tendon etc.) causes P3 to ‘sink’ (be displaced distally) or to look at it in another way the hoof capsule is displaced proximally in relation to the bony column. P3 can also ‘rotate’ or the hoof capsule can be levered dorsally. This creates abnormal stresses/loads on the structures inside the hoof capsule and on the hoof capsule itself. Basically the farrier’s job is to keep P3 inside the hoof capsule, to minimise the pain the horse has to endure, to limit the amount of distortion and abnormal stresses/loads being placed upon he external and internal structures of the foot until it grows new ‘tight’ dermal/epidermal laminae attachments. There is no ‘one size fits all’ treatment method when a horse is afflicted with laminitis. I hope to show how to use various methods to support P3 and to reduce the abnormal mechanical stresses/loads placed on the hoof capsule external and internal structures on case by cases basis using different trimming/shoeing methods.

Speakers

Wednesday May 16, 2018 5:00pm - 6:00pm
Mezzanine M1 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

5:00pm

Benign oral tumors
Benign oral tumours are those tumours which can arise from the gingivae, oral mucosa, tongue, tonsil, bone or dental structures. Oral tumours are further divided into odontogenic (those tumours arising from elements involved in tooth development) and non-odontogenic tumours (arising from non-dental tissues of the oral cavity). The most common benign oral tumours fall into the family of Epulides (odontogenic tumours). These tumours are benign, but can be locally aggressive and account for over 30% of all oral tumours in the dog. They are rare in the cat. Epulides are very common benign tumours that if left untreated can become traumatised, ulcerated, or grow to a significant size before detection. They can be confused with other types of oral swellings or growths. They are responsive to surgical intervention and early detection assists in complete surgical removal. The Epulides have been reclassified and are now known as Peripheral Odontogenic Fibromas (POF) or Canine Acanthomatous Ameloblastoma (CAA). They can arise from the gingivae near teeth or the periodontal ligament of a tooth. Often tooth extraction forms a component of the surgical management. This lecture will look at the management of the common benign oral tumours found in dogs, including diagnosis, surgical treatment, prognosis and aftercare.

Speakers
avatar for Tony Caiafa

Tony Caiafa

Veterinary Dentist, The Smile Centre
Graduated University of Melbourne BVSc 1978 Graduated Dux of class University of melbourne BDSc 1998 MANCVS Small animal surgery, Small animal dentistry and oral surgery Lectured, authored many times in the field of Veterinary dentistry both within Australia and worldwide. Currently... Read More →


Wednesday May 16, 2018 5:00pm - 6:00pm
Mezzanine M2 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

5:00pm

Alleviating Canine Fears & Phobias of Thunderstorms
From natural fear to frantic phobia. Different reactions to storms require the clinician to offer many supportive options for the alleviation of fears and phobias.

Speakers
avatar for Theresa DePorter

Theresa DePorter

Oakland Veterinary Referral Services
Board Certified Veterinary Behaviourist at Oakland Veterinary Referral Services in metropolitan Detroit Michigan USA  Graduated from Purdue in 1992.  Diplomate in both the American College of Veterinary Behaviorists (ACVB) and European College of Animal Welfare and Behavioural Medicine... Read More →


Wednesday May 16, 2018 5:00pm - 6:00pm
Mezzanine M3 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

5:00pm

Public perceptions of farm animal welfare and their effects on livestock welfare
Concerns about livestock animal welfare are well documented worldwide. Public attitudes are often studied as indicators of risk for the marketing of livestock products, but are less often studies in relation to their association with community behaviours that are likely to impact on the livestock industries. This paper examines the relationships between public attitudes, meat consumption and the community behaviours that are likely to impact on the sustainability of the livestock industries.

Speakers
GC

Grahame Coleman

University of Melbourne


Wednesday May 16, 2018 5:00pm - 6:00pm
Plaza P1 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

5:30pm

Epidemiology of Salmonella in poultry: the use of whole genome sequencing to identify points of entry and transmission pathways
Current routine surveillance activities for Salmonella spp. in commercial poultry production rely on the use of phenotyping (serotyping and phage typing) tools to determine the entry of Salmonella into populations. The usefulness of MLVA typing (Salmonella Typhimurium) for surveillance beyond outbreak investigation and trace-back to farm have not been substantiated in field studies. The rapid introduction of whole genome sequencing means some of these tools are rapidly becoming unavailable. Despite many years of surveillance and research, we still know very little about the genetic relationships between Salmonella Typhimurium phage types and MLVA profiles and their usefulness in routine field surveillance in commercial production settings. In this study, I compared the use phenotyping (phage typing) and genotyping (MLVA) with whole genome sequencing to understand points of introduction and transmission of Salmonella Typhimurium within two poultry enterprises, egg layer and chicken meat.

Speakers
HC

Helen Crabb

University of Melbourne


Wednesday May 16, 2018 5:30pm - 6:00pm
Plaza P3 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre
 
Thursday, May 17
 

7:00am

Public Health Workshop (Jakob Zinsstag)
Speakers
avatar for Jakob Zinsstag

Jakob Zinsstag

Deputy head, Human and Animal Health Unit, Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute
Jakob Zinsstag graduated with a doctorate in veterinary medicine (Dr. med. vet.) on salmonella diagnosis from the Veterinary Faculty of the University of Berne in 1986 and holds a PhD in tropical animal production. After his studies, he worked in rural practice and as post-doctoral... Read More →


Thursday May 17, 2018 7:00am - 9:00am
Mezzanine M2 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

8:00am

Endocrinology in Emergencies
Medical emergencies are commonly encountered in equine practice and can be difficult to manage as they often involve a medical challenge and an uncertain outcome. Equine emergencies are varied, including colic, shock or acutely ill neonate, and usually involve more than one body system. Many markers have been used to try to predict the outcome of horses in these situations; however, few have proven reliable in different situations. During an emergency situation, the endocrine system is challenged and its ability to respond appropriately is associated with survival. Studies of large populations of horses have demonstrated that tight hormonal regulation was paramount for a positive outcome in emergencies. During critical illness, a transient adrenocortical dysfunction called relative adrenal insufficiency or critical illness-related corticosteroid insufficiency have been described in both equine adults and neonates and is associated with disease and disease severity. Similarly, poor regulation of insulin and glucose dynamics in sick foals and adults have been shown to be associated with morbidity and mortality. Overall several endocrine markers can be used in adults and neonates to determine disease severity and predict outcome.

Speakers
avatar for Francois-Rene Bertin

Francois-Rene Bertin

Senior Lecturer in Equine Internal Medicine, The University of Queensland
François-René graduated with a DVM from the National Veterinary School of Nantes (France). After completing an internship in equine medicine and surgery at the National Veterinary School of Alfort (France), François-René trained in Equine Internal Medicine at the Purdue University... Read More →


Thursday May 17, 2018 8:00am - 8:30am
Mezzanine M1 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

8:00am

Gaps in nematode research and communication capacity – an industry risk ?
Small ruminant nematodes remain a major cause of impaired animal health and production, but are the resources to develop and communicate effective recommendations to livestock owners still adequate ? Research over recent years has developed new strategies to optimise worm control efficiency and prolong the life of remaining effective products. Some other approaches, especially non-anthelmintic, are less well-developed or more complex to implement, and require further development for routine adoption. The need to increase the implementation of research-backed strategies and to explore less-developed approaches is well-recognised, but the number of specialist livestock parasite researchers has declined in recent years, and the extension effort by most state government organisations has also reduced. We need debate on the structures and strategies appropriate to ensure sufficient technical expertise and communication resources, or we risk increasing, but avoidable, parasitic losses to the small ruminant industries.

Speakers
avatar for Brown Besier

Brown Besier

Veterinary Parasitologist, Brown Besier Parasitology
Graduated Bachelor of Veterinary Science from the University of Queensland in 1973, and worked with the WA Department of Agriculture until 2016, as a field veterinary officer and then a parasitologist from 1980. Completed a PhD on Barbers Pole worm in 1992, and was Leader of parasitology... Read More →


Thursday May 17, 2018 8:00am - 8:30am
Plaza P3 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

8:00am

Practical blood transfusion in the cat
Practical approach to blood transfusion in the cat, with an emphasis on important differences between canine and feline transfusion medicine, and on what can be managed safely and effectively in general practice.

Speakers
avatar for Andrew Mackin

Andrew Mackin

Head, Department of Clinical Sciences, Mississippi State University
Andrew Mackin is Professor and Head of the Department of Clinical Sciences at the Mississippi State University College of Veterinary Medicine. After graduating from Murdoch University he completed an internship and residency in small animal medicine at the University of Melbourne... Read More →


Thursday May 17, 2018 8:00am - 9:00am
Great Hall Doors 1 and 8 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

8:00am

"One World - One Welfare": International work on human behaviour change and animal welfare
Developing an effective approach for bridging the gap between what are often perceived as competing agendas in relation to human/society and animal welfare, is essential for engaging communities and governments in productive discussions about why animal welfare matters and the need for change. In these situations, animal welfare improvement initiatives need to be multi-faceted, taking into account not just scientific, ethical, and economic evidence, but also the religious and cultural context, and other factors such as international trade policy considerations. Although human welfare, social welfare, and animal welfare have traditionally been viewed as distinct disciplines, a new integrating concept, ‘One Welfare’, is suggested as a way forward for exploring and explaining the inter-connectedness of human and animal welfare, and the reliance humans have on healthy, productive animals.

Speakers
avatar for Nat Waran

Nat Waran

Executive Dean and Professor (One Welfare), Eastern Institute of Technology, Te Aho a Māui
Nat gained a first class Zoology degree from Glasgow University, and PhD from Cambridge University’s Veterinary School funded by the British Veterinary Association. She joined Edinburgh University in 1990 to develop a unique PG Masters in the relatively new area of Applied Animal... Read More →


Thursday May 17, 2018 8:00am - 9:00am
Mezzanine M3 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

8:00am

What do animal owners really want from you? Did we ask them yet?
Any successful business must deliver a service that people are prepared to pay for, in a way that's better than other available providers. So when your competitors deliver essentially the same herd health monitoring or kitten programmes that you do, why should owners and smallholders choose you? It comes down to meeting their needs, and the only way you'll know what they want is to ask them. Because they don't just want expert care, they want to receive it in a way that doesn't make them feel patronised. They don't just want longer opening hours; they want the flexibility to drop their pet off at lunchtime for afternoon surgery. It's so easy to collect accurate and meaningful data from clients and local owners, and in this session we'll look at Onswitch data as well as sharing ideas on how to get up to speed with what your clients really want, so you can then get on with doing it.

Speakers
avatar for Alison Lambert

Alison Lambert

Managing Director, On Switch
A farmer's daughter from Yorkshire, Alison qualified from Liverpool University in 1989. She worked in practice for several years before pursuing a business career with Hills Pet Nutrition and MARS, where she discovered the passion for the customer experience that her award-winning... Read More →


Thursday May 17, 2018 8:00am - 9:00am
Mezzanine M4 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

8:00am

Cattle Medicine - Diarrhoea in post-rearing cattle
Neonatal and pre-weaning diarrhoea is a major cause of losses in young cattle. Likewise, parasitic gastro-enteritis can cause significant impairment of growth rate in rearing cattle. In older cattle, by contrast, diarrhoea is a less common presentation, and may often be a secondary sign associated with disorders of body systems other than the GI tract. The diagnosis of causes of diarrhoea is aided by looking at the pattern of age and incidence of cases: for example, acute diarrhoea in many animals is likely to have a different aetiology to chronic diarrhoea in sporadic cases. Many cases of diarrhoea can be diagnosed upon clinical signs alone: faecal culture or parasitology are generally best used only as a means of confirming a diagnosis. Most of the causes of diarrhoea in cattle have infectious or toxic aetiologies. Bacterial infections account for many acute cases (e.g. salmonellosis, yersiniosis), whilst Johne’s disease is undoubtedly the most important cause of diarrhoea in older cattle. Viruses and parasites are, generally, less common causes: BVD (despite its name) does not cause significant outbreaks of diarrhoea in adults, whilst parasitic infections of adults is largely limited to Type II ostertagiasis. On the other hand, there are a great many toxic causes of diarrhoea, and diarrhoea can also be associated with liver disorders, heart failure, rumen acidosis, a non-specific sign of toxaemia and, rarely, of renal amyloidosis. The faeces of cow change dramatically with feed and season, of course, so the faeces of cows on lush spring pasture can be exceedingly liquid. Treatment, where appropriate, is usually symptomatic; correcting fluid losses and giving antibiotics (anthelmintics) as required. A diagnosis of Johne’s disease in a naïve herd is of some importance, as it is notifiable in several states and may also result in movement restrictions being placed upon the herd.

Speakers
avatar for Tim Parkinson

Tim Parkinson

Tim Parkinson is Professor of Farm Animal Reproduction & Health at Massey University, New Zealand. He graduated from Bristol University and initially worked in cattle practice and cattle AI in the UK. After his PhD in reproductive physiology at Nottingham University, he lectured in... Read More →


Thursday May 17, 2018 8:00am - 9:00am
Plaza P1 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

8:00am

Setting Up and Operating Animal Blood Banks
Until relatively recently, transfusion medicine critical care for animals has not been readily available or well-utilized. Typical hurdles encountered by most veterinarians include: the expense of maintaining donor animals; difficulty in isolating donors in a practice setting after screening for pathogens; the fact that blood usage is too sporadic to justify maintaining donors or there are not enough donors to meet the demand; concern for the health and well-being of donors used infrequently; locating suitable animals for donors; selecting them by blood type, and screening to ensure their health; and confusion about how and when to use blood components. Today, veterinary transfusion medicine is a vibrant emerging specialty, which underscores the need for establishing local, regional, and national blood banking services for animals to support the development of sophisticated medical and surgical support for pets that parallel those of human medicine. At the same time, the emergence of pet animal health insurance programs helps to provide a means of financial support for advanced critical care. Despite these efforts, most of the world’s needs are not being met today. The demand exceeds supply and individual programs still need to be standardized to ensure safety and efficacy. Whole blood is no longer the treatment of choice, nor is it desirable for the primary therapy of most veterinary transfusio¬ns. Processing freshly collected blood into several clinically useful components is a more cost-effective, efficient and safer use of this precious life-saving resource. The most commonly used blood components in veterinary medicine parallel those in human medicine, namely packed red blood cells and fresh-frozen plasma.

Speakers
avatar for Jean Dodds

Jean Dodds

Hemopet
W. Jean Dodds, DVM graduated in 1964 from the Ontario Veterinary College, Canada. She has 5 decades of veterinary clinical and diagnostic research, over 150 publications, and membership in national and international committees. Hemopet, her non-profit national animal blood bank was... Read More →


Thursday May 17, 2018 8:00am - 9:00am
Plaza P2 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

8:30am

Heat Stress in Horses: Focus on Exertional Heat Illness
Thoroughbred racehorses generate enormous heat loads during racing. Dissipation of heat by sweating is reduced in hot and humid conditions which can result in a failure of adequate heat loss and the development of Exertional heat illness (EHI). This syndrome differs from heat stress seen in endurance horses, which features dehydration and electrolyte imbalance. EHI is characterised by the development of abnormal behavioural and neurological signs associated with hyperthermia of the CNS, including agitation and kicking, which can progress to ataxia and collapse. Neurological signs can be reversed with a single intravenous dose of detomidine but the mainstay of treatment is active cooling. The precise weather conditions predisposing to the development of EHI have not been well studied and are the subject of ongoing research which will allow for the development of better guidelines for the prevention and management of this condition. Education of racing administrators, trainers and strappers will assist in reducing the risks of this potentially fatal syndrome.

Speakers
FM

Finola McConaghy

Technical Services Manager, Ceva Animal Health
Technical Services Manager for Ceva, trained as equine medicine specialist, PhD in heat stress in horses, run R&D programme for Ceva in Australia. Happy to discuss Ceva products for horses and small animals .


Thursday May 17, 2018 8:30am - 9:00am
Mezzanine M1 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

8:30am

Bridging the gap between research and development and adoption
There is a long-held frustration in the agriculture industries around getting research and development adopted on-farm. This presentation will look at the key factors limiting uptake of research and development and offer tips and practical advice to improving the pipeline through to adoption.

Speakers

Thursday May 17, 2018 8:30am - 9:00am
Plaza P3 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

9:00am

Exercise. Is it worth it?
The Department of Agriculture and Water Resources (the department) has been working to improve surge capacity for emergency response, a key issue identified in the 2011 Matthews report, through the International Animal Health Emergency Reserve (IAHER) Arrangement. The IAHER Arrangement benefits all signatory countries by providing additional personnel in an emergency and valuable experience to deployed personnel. Australia, New Zealand, the USA, Canada, the UK and Ireland first signed the IAHER Arrangement in 2004 however it was not activated until August 2017. This was a result of work led by Australia to develop and test an IAHER operations manual to provide the tools required to efficiently use the IAHER Arrangement. Exercise Athena, the first exercise of its kind, was held in November 2016 and tested the policies and procedures of the IAHER Arrangement. The benefits of Exercise Athena were realised when New Zealand activated the IAHER Arrangement in August 2017. Australia deployed thirteen personnel to New Zealand to assist with response to Mycoplasma bovis.

Speakers

Thursday May 17, 2018 9:00am - 9:30am
Mezzanine M2 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

9:00am

Are we meeting the welfare needs of pet cats in Australia?
A growing number of pet cats in Australia are being kept solely indoors. Their welfare is therefore highly dependent on the care and resources provided by their owners. A survey of over 12,000 cat owners in Australia revealed that a significant proportion of cat owners are not providing adequate basic resources for their cats, such as sufficient litter trays that are cleaned frequently enough, scratching materials, or feeding in a way that fulfils their natural predatory behaviours. Combined, these inadequate provisions are likely to be having adverse consequences on their health and welfare. Indeed a high proportion of owners also reported urinary tract disorders and inappropriate toileting, and there was a positive association between this and several factors related to the cats environment and care. Survey respondents reported that they most commonly obtained advice about feeding and toileting management from veterinarians, and thus in highlighting these issues there is a huge opportunity for veterinarians to have a widespread impact on improving the welfare of pet cats.

Speakers

Thursday May 17, 2018 9:00am - 9:30am
Mezzanine M3 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

9:00am

Emergency Management of the Immune-Mediated Blood Disorders
Emergency management of IMHA and IMT, with an emphasis on immediate drug therapy, vincristine, supportive care, transfusion and alternative options such as splenectomy, plasmapheresis and human immunoglobulins in critical situations.

Speakers
avatar for Andrew Mackin

Andrew Mackin

Head, Department of Clinical Sciences, Mississippi State University
Andrew Mackin is Professor and Head of the Department of Clinical Sciences at the Mississippi State University College of Veterinary Medicine. After graduating from Murdoch University he completed an internship and residency in small animal medicine at the University of Melbourne... Read More →


Thursday May 17, 2018 9:00am - 10:00am
Great Hall Doors 1 and 8 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

9:00am

Equine metabolic syndrome – what do we know now?
The original ACVIM consensus defined Equine metabolic syndrome (EMS) in 2010 as a syndrome of obesity, insulin resistance (IR) and laminitis. However, since then, research evidence has changed our understanding of the syndrome. EMS is a collection of risk factors for the development of endocrinopathic laminitis. The central defining pathophysiological feature is insulin dysregulation. While obesity is an important risk factor, obesity and lipid dysregulation, as well as cardiovascular and other features are not consistently found with the syndrome. The aims of this presentation are to: 1. Discuss the pathophysiology of EMS focusing on the central feature of insulin dysregulation and how it might develop. 2. Discuss the other risk factors associated with EMS including obesity and lipid dysregulation. Recent research from the USA on new research into the genetic risk factors will also be discussed. 3. Discuss the history and epidemiology of EMS, including research from Australia on hyperinsulinaemia in ponies and new research form the UK looking at the prevalence and risk factors for EMS.

Speakers
avatar for Cathy McGowan

Cathy McGowan

University of Liverpool
Cathy is Professor of Equine Internal Medicine, Head of Department, Equine Clinical Science at The University of Liverpool, Institute of Veterinary Science.Graduating from the University of Sydney (1991) she has aPhD in equine exercise physiology, RCVS and European Diplomas and recognised... Read More →


Thursday May 17, 2018 9:00am - 10:00am
Mezzanine M1 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

9:00am

Communication clarity for compliance- what do we really say to owners, no wonder they don’t come in!
What we say and what owners hear can be so different. This session will look at the fine art of communication, sharing some best practice principles that will help the entire team communicate more clearly and effectively with clients. Simple tips include not using jargon, recommending clear and specific intervention rather than using vague terms such as "perhaps we could", "I think we'll" and (worst of all) "let's wait and see". We'll look at academic research currently taking place in the UK into telephone communications in veterinary practices, highlighting where there's room for improvement at the reception desk. We'll look at data collected from consult rooms, identifying how much of what we say routinely can be misleading or inadvertently undermine our expertise. We'll then use this data to inform better practice, helping you ensure that clients visit more often and feel more engaged with their animal's care.

Speakers
avatar for Alison Lambert

Alison Lambert

Managing Director, On Switch
A farmer's daughter from Yorkshire, Alison qualified from Liverpool University in 1989. She worked in practice for several years before pursuing a business career with Hills Pet Nutrition and MARS, where she discovered the passion for the customer experience that her award-winning... Read More →


Thursday May 17, 2018 9:00am - 10:00am
Mezzanine M4 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

9:00am

Cattle medicine - Surgical conditions of the gastrointestinal tract
The disorders of the gastro-intestinal system of the cow are quite unlike those of any other domestic animals, as a result of the presence of the forestomachs. In general terms, the surgical conditions of the GI tract are (i) blockages, (ii) displacements, (iii) torsions and (iv) perforations. The diagnosis of GIT lesions is, arguably, the most complex differential that occurs in cattle and, of course, lesions of organs other than the GIT can present as apparently “classic” cases of gut disorders. Some GIT disorders result in classic signs of an ‘acute abdomen’ (e.g. shock, toxaemia), whilst others are more likely to present as wasting and/or inappetence. Horse-like colic is a rare symptom in cattle and, even in quite severe lesions of the GIT, many cows will show few signs beyond mild discomfort and inappetence. In most cases, diagnosis can be made on clinical signs: most of the conditions have a relatively specific combination of clinical signs, abdominal contour, profile of sounds on percussion/ ballottement/ auscultation of the two flanks, and pattern of distension of viscera on palpation per rectum. Non-GIT lesions that have ‘gut-like’ signs can present particular diagnostic challenges, whilst pre-patent infectious diarrhoea can potentially be confused with a ‘surgical’ condition. Laboratory tests can be used for confirmation (e.g. elevated WCC in traumatic reticulitis) or prognostic purposes (e.g. electrolyte profile in cases of torsion), rather than as primary means of diagnosis. Surgery is nearly always undertaken in a standing patient, using paravertebral or regional infiltration to anaesthetise the flank that is to be incised. Releasing gas and/or decompression of the gut is usually required for the replacement of a twisted viscus, but, otherwise, normal methods for the surgery of bowel apply. Animals with an ‘acute abdomen’ require circulatory stabilisation before surgery, and have a sufficiently guarded prognosis that the economic worthwhile of surgery should be established with the owner before the procedure is started. Most cases require a significant period of antibiotic cover after the completion of surgery.

Speakers
avatar for Tim Parkinson

Tim Parkinson

Tim Parkinson is Professor of Farm Animal Reproduction & Health at Massey University, New Zealand. He graduated from Bristol University and initially worked in cattle practice and cattle AI in the UK. After his PhD in reproductive physiology at Nottingham University, he lectured in... Read More →


Thursday May 17, 2018 9:00am - 10:00am
Plaza P1 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

9:00am

Genomics, Genetics and Epigenetics for Animal Health and Longevity
Understanding environmental modelling of the genome is only just beginning, as science learns to integrate genomics (gene expression), with genetics (predisposition) and epigenetics (programming or imprinting). Epigenetics studies how the genome is programmed for health and longevity; provides insights into metabolic regulation; involves mechanisms of development, parental gene imprinting, and metabolic programming beyond genetic control; and modulates gene expression throughout life. Genetic and epigenetic markers define predisposition and susceptibility to disease, and requires study of the epigenome, which is tissue and stage-of-life dependent, and varies markedly between individuals and species. Epigenetics also encompasses the study of how external influences, like diet, affect the activity and expression of genes in the DNA. Thus, epigenetics encompasses understanding and achieving the potential of nutrition to maintain health and prevent disease. Genes make up just two percent of the genome. Humans, cats and dogs have about 22,000 genes. The remainder of the genome (98%) holds the vast majority of information that programs the genes and controls gene expression. The epigenome controls inheritance, and epigenetics is the new science that focuses on changes in gene activity that do not result in parallel changes in DNA sequences or structure. It results in molecular modification of DNA by methylation, production of modified histones (proteins), and RNA interference (RNAi). Importantly, nutrition modulates gene expression through the genome and metabolism in combination with epigenetic factors.

Speakers
avatar for Jean Dodds

Jean Dodds

Hemopet
W. Jean Dodds, DVM graduated in 1964 from the Ontario Veterinary College, Canada. She has 5 decades of veterinary clinical and diagnostic research, over 150 publications, and membership in national and international committees. Hemopet, her non-profit national animal blood bank was... Read More →


Thursday May 17, 2018 9:00am - 10:00am
Plaza P2 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

9:00am

PANEL: The gap between livestock research & implementation: the role of veterinarians and others
Thursday May 17, 2018 9:00am - 10:00am
Plaza P3 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

9:30am

NZ’s Mycoplasma bovis emergency response and IAHER
Refreshing our knowledge of Mycoplasma bovis in both dairy and beef cattle including characteristics and symptoms of this disease, diagnosis, modes of transmission, prevention and control. The disease is known to cause unusual mastitis in dairy cattle that doesn’t respond to treatment, arthritis in cows and calves, late term abortions, high numbers of calf deaths and Bovine Respiratory Disease in beef feedlot cattle. Also an explanation is given of the workings of the IAHER agreement and the deployment of epidemiologists and laboratory personnel from Australia to NZ’s emergency response to the first known incursion of this bacterial infection. The bacteria is an Unwanted Organism under NZ’s Biosecurity Act 1993, despite being commonly found internationally. Mycoplasma bovis is not listed with the OIE and does not present a trade risk for NZ’s animal products. Dr Harradine was assigned the task of designing a survey of the beef cattle population of NZ for Mycoplasma bovis. This was to assist in answering the question whether the NZ beef industry is free of the disease or if it has been present for some time undetected. Details of NZ’s effort to contain the spread of the disease and, if possible, eradicate it following the original detection in July 2017 in dairy cattle in the Oamaru area of the South Island will be given. The current situation report and future activity will also be discussed.

Speakers
avatar for Ian Harradine

Ian Harradine

On Plant Veterinary Officer, Department of Agriculture and Water Resources
Dr Ian Harradine is a veterinary officer with the Department of Agriculture and Water Resources. He was deployed to New Zealand as an epidemiologist to assist with the outbreak of Mycoplasma bovis in August 2017 in response to activation of the International Animal Health Emergency... Read More →


Thursday May 17, 2018 9:30am - 10:00am
Mezzanine M2 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

9:30am

Incorporating welfare assessments into decision making in wild horse management
The management of wild horses in Australia, particularly in NSW and Victoria, is highly contentious. However there is very little known about the population and behavioural ecology, and the welfare of the horses, upon which to base ethical management decisions. Arguments for actively managing wild horses populations more intensively are mainly based on concerns surrounding environmental impacts of the horses, whilst many wild horse advocates argue against more intensive wild horse management on welfare grounds. The welfare of wild horses however has never been formally assessed, and thus the impacts of different management strategies on wild horse populations is unknown. Assessing the welfare of wild horses alongside other metrics like abundance, density, and reproductive rates may help to better inform ethical management decisions, and resolve some of these conflicts. This is exemplified with a case study of one small population of wild horses where their population and behavioural ecology and welfare was very closely monitored over a 17 month period, with findings used to successfully implement a management plan aimed at achieving the optimal welfare outcomes for the horses in addition to meeting other conservation goals.

Speakers

Thursday May 17, 2018 9:30am - 10:00am
Mezzanine M3 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

10:30am

Ben Cunneen Memorial Plenary: One Health and its potential for integrated disease surveillance and control
Speakers
avatar for Jakob Zinsstag

Jakob Zinsstag

Deputy head, Human and Animal Health Unit, Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute
Jakob Zinsstag graduated with a doctorate in veterinary medicine (Dr. med. vet.) on salmonella diagnosis from the Veterinary Faculty of the University of Berne in 1986 and holds a PhD in tropical animal production. After his studies, he worked in rural practice and as post-doctoral... Read More →


Thursday May 17, 2018 10:30am - 11:30am
Great Hall Doors 1 and 8 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

11:30am

Health and disease causation: epidemiological concepts in integrative medicine
Veterinary epidemiology may be regarded as the study of disease in populations of animals, especially livestock. However, understanding the factors that maintain health are equally important. Integrative medicine and epidemiology share a holistic approach to complex health problems. They both look at the association between exposures and outcomes. There may be a complex web of relationships between 'causes', such as exposure to risk factors and the 'outcome', which may be a disease or health event. Understanding the relationships between risk factors such as the host, agent and environment are central to the practice of veterinary science. Knowledge of the patterns of health, disease and medicines is fundamental to all integrative medical systems.

Speakers
MK

Megan Kearney

Dr Megan Kearney is an integrative veterinary surgeon and Medical Herbalist. She runs a veterinary hospital and practice for people in Bangalow, Northern NSW. She sees a wide range of species including companion animals, horses, livestock, exotics and wildlife. Megan was inspired... Read More →


Thursday May 17, 2018 11:30am - 12:00pm
Plaza P2 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

11:30am

Canine chronic enteropathy - time for prednisolone... or not
Chronic vomiting and diarrhoea are commonly seen in practice. After ruling out extra-intestinal disease, different treatment options are available. We will discuss the evidence available to support food, antibiotic, or immune-suppressive trials and what is the long-term response. Finally, we will mention novel treatment options, which are being developed such as faecal microbiota transplant and stem cell therapies. At the end of this lecture, you should be able to answer the following questions: 1. What tests to consider to rule out extra-intestinal disease as a cause for chronic diarrhoea and vomiting. 2. What type of food to use for a diet trial? 3. How to improve owners’ compliance when asking to perform a food trial for their pet? 4. When should you consider taking intestinal biopsies? 5. What immune-suppressive have been described to treat chronic enteropathy? You should feel comfortable to develop a diagnostic plan for a dog with chronic enteropathy. A stepwise approach is important to optimize treatment response and do not forget that the majority of dogs respond to diet change alone!

Speakers
JD

Julien Dandrieux

Univeristy of Melbourne
Julien graduated in 2002 from the University of Bern in Switzerland. He did a rotating internship in the same institution, followed by his medicine residency, which was a joint program between the University of Bern and Louisiana State University. Julien then worked as a clinician... Read More →


Thursday May 17, 2018 11:30am - 12:30pm
Great Hall Doors 1 and 8 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

11:30am

Communicating with the Emotional or Irrational Client
Working with emotional or irrational clients can be one of the hardest parts of the job. There are many reasons why clients’ express strong emotions, and veterinarians who develop the skills to navigate these interactions generally report less stress and compassion fatigue. Additionally, when we are able to provide a safe space for clients to share their true feelings (whether it be fear, sadness or shame), it can create a more trusting Vet-Client relationship and therefore better outcomes for the patient. This session will explore ‘the emotional brain’ and how emotions such as anger can often disguise the real issue. Understanding what someone is trying to tell you whether verbally or nonverbally, can provide you with cues that guide the way that you respond. The session will also delve into the critical skills of empathy and emotional intelligence (self-awareness and self-management) and provide practical verbal and non-verbal communication techniques for you to add to your toolbox.

Speakers

Thursday May 17, 2018 11:30am - 12:30pm
Mezzanine M1 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

11:30am

Complications of dental extractions
Speakers
avatar for Tony Caiafa

Tony Caiafa

Veterinary Dentist, The Smile Centre
Graduated University of Melbourne BVSc 1978 Graduated Dux of class University of melbourne BDSc 1998 MANCVS Small animal surgery, Small animal dentistry and oral surgery Lectured, authored many times in the field of Veterinary dentistry both within Australia and worldwide. Currently... Read More →


Thursday May 17, 2018 11:30am - 12:30pm
Mezzanine M2 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

11:30am

Misbehaving or misunderstood? Addressing problems with horse behaviour and human safety
With the rise in horse ownership and equestrian activities, comes an increase in the risk of equine related accidents, alongside concerns over the welfare of horses, particularly as a result of the impact of training and riding techniques and equipment and the expectations people have of their horses. Resultant equine behavioural problems are a problem not only for the rider/handler but also for the horse. There are serious human safety issues related to the way in which horses respond behaviourally when stressed or in pain that need to be addressed. Recent surveys show that equine vets are at the highest risk of injury of all the civilian professions, and accidents involving horse riders/handlers, are far too common. There is, therefore a need to address both horse and handler welfare through better educating the human about why horse behavioural responses occur, how to avoid behavioural conflict situations, and what to do if the horse develops a problem behaviour.

Speakers
avatar for Nat Waran

Nat Waran

Executive Dean and Professor (One Welfare), Eastern Institute of Technology, Te Aho a Māui
Nat gained a first class Zoology degree from Glasgow University, and PhD from Cambridge University’s Veterinary School funded by the British Veterinary Association. She joined Edinburgh University in 1990 to develop a unique PG Masters in the relatively new area of Applied Animal... Read More →


Thursday May 17, 2018 11:30am - 12:30pm
Mezzanine M3 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

11:30am

PANEL: State of Leadership
From all corners of the profession, some of the most dynamic and influential leaders in the veterinary business today. Ever wondered what key leaders in the profession think, or what the keys to leadership are in today's environment?

Thursday May 17, 2018 11:30am - 12:30pm
Mezzanine M4 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

11:30am

Control of tick fever in introduced cattle
Cattle introduced to properties within the cattle tick endemic regions of Australia, especially from cattle tick-free regions, may be susceptible to acute, life-threatening disease due to tick fever (babesiosis or anaplasmosis). Vaccines are available to help prevent clinical tick fever, but there are a number of considerations which need to be taken into account for vaccination to be effective. This presentation will cover the various factors affecting whether vaccination will be effective, and the common problems encountered with vaccination of introduced animals.

Speakers
PC

Phillip Carter

Department of Ag, Queensland


Thursday May 17, 2018 11:30am - 12:30pm
Plaza P1 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

11:30am

Apicomplexa in Australian livestock – concerns and knowledge gaps
A number of Apicomplexan genera are known to occur in Australian livestock. Although Apicomplexan protozoa also infect poultry and pigs, this presentation is confined to cattle, sheep and goats. The parasites’ life histories vary from direct, single host life cycles, to complex life cycles involving several species of arthropod vectors. Livestock can act as either definitive, intermediate, or incidental hosts. Apicomplexans are final host specific and their target tissues range from erythrocytes, intestinal epithelium, lymphocytes, neurones, and striated muscle cells to the epidermis and sclera. Knowledge about their adverse impact on livestock production and reproduction varies. In addition, they may reduce the profitability of red meat for aesthetic reasons, or pose a potential zoonotic risk to consumers. Although certain life cycle stages may be macroscopically visible in some genera, most of them require microscopic, serological or molecular confirmation of their diagnosis

Speakers
JS

Johann Schroder

Johann Schröder After qualifying as a veterinarian at Onderstepoort in South Africa and a short stint in mixed private practice, Dr Schröder joined the multi-national pharmaceutical industry and specialised in veterinary parasitology, in which he holds a Master’s degree. His industry... Read More →


Thursday May 17, 2018 11:30am - 12:30pm
Plaza P3 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

12:00pm

The Integration of standard treatment for canine mitral valve disease and dilated cardiomyopathy, with complimentary therapies
Canine Cardiac Disease classification Canine Cardiac disease is defined as occurring four stages: A, B C and D. A is asymptomatic but at risk, according to breed dynamics. B is symptomatic on clinical examination, but compensated so that owners are unaware of any problems. C shows overt disease, and D has progressed to uncompensated heart failure. Standard treatments include enapril, frusemide and primabendin in late Stage B depending on the level of compensation, and C and D. Complimentary therapies It is possible that intervening with complimentary therapies in early stages will slow disease progression, reduce dose rate and frequency of standard medications when these are needed, and reduce the time in hospital. Gut dysbiosis affects the metabolism from an early age. Care should be taken with cesarian births, and gut flora balance rectified as soon as possible. Taurine, Coenzyme Q 10, Acetyl l Carnitine and Mussel extract, EPA/ DHA are nutritional supplements, which can improve heart function and be added to the food. Hawthorne, Siberian Ginseng and Kumbuk (Arjuna) are herbs which have long historical use in improving human heart function, and are used extensively today in dogs. Their functions are described, and their use with structural therapies.

Speakers

Thursday May 17, 2018 12:00pm - 12:30pm
Plaza P2 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

2:00pm

Efficacy of three lice treatments in Dorpers
The aims of the study were to: 1) survey the presence of lice in Cleanskin sheep; 2) determine the efficacy in Cleanskin sheep of three lousicides commonly used in wool breeds; and 3) provide recommendations for the control of lice on Cleanskin breeds of sheep. A survey of 20 properties with Cleanskin sheep found 4 with lice infestations. A mob of 72 Dorper lambs infested with lice were confinement fed together for 3 months to establish a uniform moderate lice burden. Six lambs were then randomly allocated into each of 12 double fenced pens representing three replications of 4 treatment groups for a further 2 months. The 4 groups consisted of three chemical applications: Imidacloprid, Extinosad and Ivermectin and a control group. All treatments were found to be effective in removing lice (p< 0.05) and recommendations were made for the control of lice in Cleanskin sheep.

Speakers
avatar for Colin Trengove

Colin Trengove

Managing Director, Pro Ag Consulting
Colin is a 1979 Murdoch and 1989 Mackinnon Project graduate as well as Director of Pro Ag Consulting - a business set up in 1996 focussed on the nutrition of soil, plant and animal to achieve optimum livestock health and production. He is currently enrolled in a PhD examining the... Read More →


Thursday May 17, 2018 2:00pm - 2:30pm
Plaza P3 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

2:00pm

Feline Intestinal small cell lymphoma or chronic enteropathy? How to differentiate them and treat them.
Chronic enteropathy and intestinal small cell lymphoma can be difficult to differentiate in cats. After ruling out extra-intestinal diseases and food responsive enteropathy, it is often time to consider biopsies to further characterize the underlying disease. So, it is biopsies time. But have you thought of the following: - How do you want to perform your biopsies? Surgical, of course!!! Or maybe with endoscopy? - How many biopsies do you take? - Where do you take the biopsies from? - Now, the biopsies are in the formalin, what do we do with them? Is histology the answer? These are some of the questions that we will discuss during this session. We will also review newer methods that can be helpful to diagnose intestinal small cell lymphoma and guide you to choose the optimal treatment for your feline cases. Although intestinal small cell lymphoma has a poorer prognosis than chronic enteropathy, many cats will have a great quality of life with the appropriate choice of treatment for several years! And one last question: for once, do you think that dogs are big cats?

Speakers
JD

Julien Dandrieux

Univeristy of Melbourne
Julien graduated in 2002 from the University of Bern in Switzerland. He did a rotating internship in the same institution, followed by his medicine residency, which was a joint program between the University of Bern and Louisiana State University. Julien then worked as a clinician... Read More →


Thursday May 17, 2018 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Great Hall Doors 1 and 8 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

2:00pm

Dilemmas in diagnosis of EMS: is it the waistline or the carbs?
Equine metabolic syndrome (EMS) is a collection of metabolic and endocrine abnormalities associated with a high risk of laminitis. Although many horses with EMS have general or regional obesity, not all obese horses and ponies have EMS and EMS can occur in the absence of visibly increased adiposity. Previously, a diagnosis of EMS was most commonly investigated after the onset of laminitis. The focus now is increasingly on early detection of horses with EMS before the onset of laminitis, allowing preventive strategies to be implemented. The key feature of EMS and laminitis risk is insulin dysregulation (ID). This term was first introduced by Frank and Tadros in 2014, and refers to any combination of 3 abnormalities: 1. Tissue insulin resistance (the inability of tissues to respond appropriately to insulin) 2. Basal hyperinsulinaemia 3. Postprandial (post “carbs”) hyperinsulinaemia. The aims of this presentation are to: 1. Discuss how best to diagnose insulin dysregulation, including consideration of whether the test is measuring insulin resistance or hyperinsulinaemia. This will include basal and dynamic testing, taking into account practical considerations and whether testing for diagnosis versus monitoring of the syndrome. 2. Discuss the use of ancillary tests such as adipokines can support the diagnosis of EMS. 3. Discuss interpretation of diagnostic tests including assessment of the accuracy and repeatability of the tests, and how to manage the differences between laboratory assays and the reference ranges produced by them versus published in the literature.

Speakers
avatar for Cathy McGowan

Cathy McGowan

University of Liverpool
Cathy is Professor of Equine Internal Medicine, Head of Department, Equine Clinical Science at The University of Liverpool, Institute of Veterinary Science.Graduating from the University of Sydney (1991) she has aPhD in equine exercise physiology, RCVS and European Diplomas and recognised... Read More →


Thursday May 17, 2018 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Mezzanine M1 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

2:00pm

Jaw fractures: non-invasive stabilisation
Speakers
avatar for Tony Caiafa

Tony Caiafa

Veterinary Dentist, The Smile Centre
Graduated University of Melbourne BVSc 1978 Graduated Dux of class University of melbourne BDSc 1998 MANCVS Small animal surgery, Small animal dentistry and oral surgery Lectured, authored many times in the field of Veterinary dentistry both within Australia and worldwide. Currently... Read More →


Thursday May 17, 2018 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Mezzanine M2 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

2:00pm

The welfare aspects of using medication to manage behaviour
Psychotropic medications should not be prescribed without considerable thought. So do you know how to tell the difference between fake news stories and scientific truth about psychotropic medications. After all these medications are designed to “alter the brain”. But isn’t that that what we want, when we use them to help our patients? So how do these medications work? Do you know which ones may be beneficial and when they can help? Do you know which ones may not be beneficial and when they may make things worse? What can these medications do for the pet? What can they not do for the pet? What happens to the pet if you do prescribe these medications? What happens to the pet if you do not prescribe these medications? What combinations can 0r should you use? There are welfare implications for using or not using psychotropic medications. The wrong medication at the incorrect dose rate is just as bad welfare wise as the wrong medication at the correct dose rate. The right medication at the incorrect dose rate is just as bad welfare wise as using the right medication at the incorrect dosing schedule.

Speakers
KS

Kersti Seksel

Sydney Animal Behaviour Service
After graduating from Sydney University as a veterinarian Kersti completed a BA in Behavioural Sciences and a MA (Hons). She is a Fellow of the Australian and New Zealand College of Veterinary Scientists, a Diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Behaviorists and a Diplomate... Read More →


Thursday May 17, 2018 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Mezzanine M3 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

2:00pm

Women in the workplace
We are living in interesting times where traditional norms are being thrown out the window both at work and at home. They are both important because of the roles that are played or expected can impact decisions in both realms. This is now impacting the number of women in the workforce and challenging the way things have been done. According to the ABS in 2016-17, the labour force participation rate of people aged 20-74 years was 66% for women and 78% for men. In 2016-17, almost half of employed women worked part time (45%), compared with 16% of employed men. This proportion rose to three in five (61%) of employed women with a child under 5, while less than one in ten fathers of young children worked part-time (8.4%). Whilst women are still the primary carers of children this will pose challenges for families as well as for businesses - but there is a silver lining.

Speakers

Thursday May 17, 2018 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Mezzanine M4 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

2:00pm

The eye's have it. Diseases of the bovine head
If you don't look you don't see. Clinical examination in the bovine is the cornerstone of diagnosis, because ancillary testing is often not readily available on farm. A good clinical exam is of paramount importance. This lecture provides a refresher on what we can learn from looking at the head and eyes. There are at least 9 conditions that can be diagnosed by looking carefully at the bovine eye. There are three conditions in which the nature of a nasal discharge is pathogonomic. If you can't name all 12, then you should attend this lecture!

Speakers
avatar for Dave Beggs

Dave Beggs

Scientific Officer, Australian Cattle Veterinarians, Scientific Officer, Australian Cattle Veterinarians
Dave Beggs wears many hats. A past convenor of the AVA conference, he works in Warrnambool as a vet, at the University of Melbourne as a lecturer in Cattle, he is the Scientific Officer of the ACV and in his spare time he is doing a PhD on the topic of ensuring animal welfare in dairy... Read More →


Thursday May 17, 2018 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Plaza P1 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

2:00pm

Cellular Oxidative Stress and Cancers
Chronic cellular inflammation from oxidative stress leads to a wide variety of diseases, including obesity, chronic infections and cancers. Chronic inflammation occurs when the tissues or organs receive inflammatory “mediator” messages that cause them to react as though the “trigger” or pathogen was still present. Rather than repairing themselves, these cells remain in an ongoing state of inflammation that can wax and wane for an entire lifetime. As a result, tissues become deficient in antioxidant mediators, such as malonedialdehyde, glutathione, cysteine, ascorbic acid and other antioxidant vitamins, which is associated with poor clinical outcome. An important aspect of this topic deals with prevention and the early recognition of the cellular changes that lead to cancer. The factors involved include: controlling chronic obesity and weight control with caloric restriction and by increasing sirtuin-based foods which help increase lifespan; feeding fat-fighting functional foods; feeding the needed rather than package recommended amounts; need for high quality bioavailable novel proteins; feeding antiangiogenic foods to help shrink fat and cancers; accepting genetic predisposition to obesity; regulation of gene expression through diet; food sensitivities/intolerances; and weight gain from spaying and neutering, and decreased physical activity and exercise. These effects also pertain to the lipid oxidation and risk of rancidity in pet foods with their higher fat and oil content.

Speakers
avatar for Jean Dodds

Jean Dodds

Hemopet
W. Jean Dodds, DVM graduated in 1964 from the Ontario Veterinary College, Canada. She has 5 decades of veterinary clinical and diagnostic research, over 150 publications, and membership in national and international committees. Hemopet, her non-profit national animal blood bank was... Read More →


Thursday May 17, 2018 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Plaza P2 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

2:30pm

Emerging strategies for sheep flystrike control Part 1
A long awaited upturn in wool and lamb prices has restored the profitability of sheep production, but there are a number of ongoing challenges. In no aspect of sheep production is this more evident than in the management of flystrike risk. Sheep producers are faced with continuing cost of production pressures and the need to maximise labour efficiency. Possible reductions in the efficacy of fly control products from the development of resistance and the potential effects of climate change are potential concerns, if not well managed. In addition, a ‘social licence to operate’ and retaining the trust of customers, consumers and community that production methods are ethical and sustainable has become an increasingly important consideration in maintaining the competitiveness of sheep products and access to high value markets. The first part of this presentation will examine some of these issues, review current practice and consider recent and potential new technologies. The second part of the presentation will discuss on-property approaches and practices that are developing to address these concerns and will consider the veterinarian’s role in facilitating the adoption of efficient and ethical flystrike control systems.

Speakers
PJ

Peter James

QAAFi, University of Queensland
Peter was Senior Principal Research Scientist and leader of the Integrated Parasite Management Group at the Queensland Government’s Animal Research Institute before joining QAAFI’s Centre for Animal Science at the University of Queensland in October 2010. This followed more than... Read More →


Thursday May 17, 2018 2:30pm - 3:00pm
Plaza P3 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

3:00pm

Emerging strategies for sheep flystrike control Part 2
This is a second part of a two-part presentation. This section will evaluate the options for producers to control flies, and identify areas of limitation and critical decision points in light of both economics and community expectations. The veterinarian’s role in facilitating the adoption of optimal and ethical flystrike control systems will also be examined. The use of pain relief in particular associated with breech strike control will be specifically addressed. On-farm decisions relating to fly control remain a challenge for producers. Research trials continue to demonstrate that mulesing provides a relatively cheap and highly effective means to control breech strike. However, community expectations and producer concerns about the welfare of the practice mean that in the future this highly effective tool will no longer be available. Both producers and veterinarians need to be aware of both short term strategies (eg use of pain relief with mulesing) and medium and long term strategies (including management and breeding).)

Speakers
avatar for Bruce Allworth

Bruce Allworth

Allworth Sheep and Cattle Production
Worked at Massey University and Melbourne University (Mackinnon Project). Operated Allworth Sheep and Cattle Consultancy Services for 25 years. Completed a pHD in footrot eradication, and coordinated the National Johnes Disease Program from 1997-2003. Operates sheep and cattle property... Read More →


Thursday May 17, 2018 3:00pm - 3:30pm
Plaza P3 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

3:00pm

Chronic Management of the Immune-Mediated Blood Disorders
Chronic management of IMHA and IMHA, with an emphasis on maintaining effective immunosuppression without side effects or infection, and on tapering therapy effectively. Drugs such as azathioprine, cyclosporine, leflunomide and mycophenolate will be discussed.

Speakers
avatar for Andrew Mackin

Andrew Mackin

Head, Department of Clinical Sciences, Mississippi State University
Andrew Mackin is Professor and Head of the Department of Clinical Sciences at the Mississippi State University College of Veterinary Medicine. After graduating from Murdoch University he completed an internship and residency in small animal medicine at the University of Melbourne... Read More →


Thursday May 17, 2018 3:00pm - 4:00pm
Great Hall Doors 1 and 8 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

3:00pm

Managing the waistline: Prevention and Management of EMS
Management of equine metabolic syndrome (EMS) consists of nutritional, exercise and possibly pharmacological interventions. It often involves major changes to feeding, exercise, turn out etc., and so ensuring that the horse’s owner is fully aware of the diagnosis, what EMS is and the importance of management is essential to ensure compliance. Setting targets, and regular monitoring and communication between vet and owner are essential. The immediate objective of EMS management is a reduction in circulating insulin concentration, especially following feeding. Goals in the medium term are normalisation of body condition score (BCS) and reduction in insulin dysregulation (ID), and in the long term a return to normal function while maintaining a low glycaemic/insulinaemic response to the diet. The aims of this presentation are to: 1. Discuss dietary management of EMS including immediate, medium term and long term aims. 2. Interpret obesity research and discuss common areas of confusion including rates and targets for weight loss and alterations in the response to dietary restriction associated with time or sensitivity to dietary restriction. The (poor) relationship between BCS and total body fat will also be discussed. 3. Discuss the use of different forage sources and nutraceuticals, including soaked hay in restricted diets, including glycaemic responses to different forages. 4. Discuss the use of exercise in the management of EMS including understanding of the appropriate intensities of exercise for horses and ponies. 5. Discuss the return of EMS horses onto pasture.

Speakers
avatar for Cathy McGowan

Cathy McGowan

University of Liverpool
Cathy is Professor of Equine Internal Medicine, Head of Department, Equine Clinical Science at The University of Liverpool, Institute of Veterinary Science.Graduating from the University of Sydney (1991) she has aPhD in equine exercise physiology, RCVS and European Diplomas and recognised... Read More →


Thursday May 17, 2018 3:00pm - 4:00pm
Mezzanine M1 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

3:00pm

Panel Discussion: Dental Dillemas - What would you do?
Thursday May 17, 2018 3:00pm - 4:00pm
Mezzanine M2 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

3:00pm

Puppy Class at the Vet Hospital
Speakers
avatar for Theresa DePorter

Theresa DePorter

Oakland Veterinary Referral Services
Board Certified Veterinary Behaviourist at Oakland Veterinary Referral Services in metropolitan Detroit Michigan USA  Graduated from Purdue in 1992.  Diplomate in both the American College of Veterinary Behaviorists (ACVB) and European College of Animal Welfare and Behavioural Medicine... Read More →


Thursday May 17, 2018 3:00pm - 4:00pm
Mezzanine M3 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

3:00pm

Flexible working careers
What is flexible work? Flexible working is the ability to negotiate when, where and how you can work. Flexible working has many positive impacts from making work more human to integrate work and life, creating a better place to work, increase staff engagement, productivity and profitability and also attract and retain great people. So why wouldn't you want to work more flexibly? For starters there are many challenges and commercial imperatives that need to be considered - it is not all one size fits all. Furthermore, there are a number of steps that need to be taken to be able to embed flexible working practices effectively. Having said that, the positive impacts it can have on your people and your business far outweigh the drawbacks, find what all the fuss is about.

Speakers

Thursday May 17, 2018 3:00pm - 4:00pm
Mezzanine M4 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

3:00pm

Cattle Medicine - Practical Therapeutics
After the therapeutic rationale, the next most important consideration in choosing a treatment is that the vast majority of cattle, and of various products produced by them, are ultimately destined for human consumption. Accordingly, the selection of drugs for use in production animals must always take into consideration drug residue levels in tissues and products and, consequently, the interval between treatment and the resumption of sale of food products from that animal. Similarly, the site of administration may not always be the most convenient: intramuscular administration should be into the neck (low value meat) rather than the more-accessible rump. Principles such as the ability of drugs to penetrate different tissues are similar to those of other species, but it is important to remember the importance of milk as a place in which the pH ‘trap’ can sequester drugs. The cost of the drug is also an important factor to bear in mind: is it necessary to use an ‘expensive’ drug if a ‘cheap’ one is nearly as good? Or does an ‘expensive’ drug with a nil milk withholding period actually work out cheaper than a ‘cheap’ drug with a long withholding period? Veterinarians only have direct control over Prescription Animal Remedies, which means that substances such as anthelmintics, trace-element supplements, metabolic treatments and some vaccines are largely out of the veterinarian’s control. However, decisions made around the use of these materials is at least as important, in terms of herd health, as the PARs that veterinarians do control. Antibiotics are probably the most widely used PAR, so veterinarians should have a good knowledge of the mode of action and tissue activities of the antibiotics that they use. Given the international attention that is currently being focused on antimicrobial resistance, veterinarians must ensure that they practice ‘good product stewardship’, not only to reduce the risk of AMR, but also to reduce the risk of losing access to different classes of antibiotics. Sadly, the same lens does not appear to be applied to non-veterinary sales of anthelmintics. Sedatives, corticosteroids, reproductive hormones, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and fluid therapy make up the balance of the veterinary pharmacopeia. The use of these drugs is less contentious than that of antibiotics: nonetheless good product stewardship and attention to withdrawal period remain important.

Speakers
avatar for Tim Parkinson

Tim Parkinson

Tim Parkinson is Professor of Farm Animal Reproduction & Health at Massey University, New Zealand. He graduated from Bristol University and initially worked in cattle practice and cattle AI in the UK. After his PhD in reproductive physiology at Nottingham University, he lectured in... Read More →


Thursday May 17, 2018 3:00pm - 4:00pm
Plaza P1 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

3:00pm

Vaccine Essentials and Potential Adverse Events
Modern vaccine technology has permitted us to protect companion animals effectively against serious infectious diseases. However, the challenge to produce effective and safe vaccines for the prevalent infectious diseases of animals has become increasingly difficult. In veterinary medicine, evidence implicating vaccines in triggering immune-mediated and other chronic disorders (vaccinosis) is compelling. While some of these problems have been traced to contaminated or poorly attenuated batches of vaccine that revert to virulence, others apparently reflect the host’s genetic predisposition to react adversely upon receiving the single (monovalent) or multiple antigen “combo” (polyvalent) products given routinely to animals. Animals of certain susceptible breeds or families appear to be at increased risk for severe and lingering adverse reactions to vaccines. The onset of adverse reactions to conventional vaccinations (or other inciting drugs, chemicals, or infectious agents) can be an immediate hypersensitivity or anaphylactic reaction, or can occur acutely (24-48 hours afterwards), or later on (10-45 days) in a delayed type immune response often caused by immune-complex formation. Typical signs of adverse immune reactions include fever, stiffness, sore joints and abdominal tenderness, susceptibility to infections, central and peripheral nervous system disorders or inflammation, collapse with autoagglutinated red blood cells and jaundice, or generalized pinpoint hemorrhages or bruises. Liver enzymes may be markedly elevated, and liver or kidney failure may accompany bone marrow suppression. Furthermore, recent vaccination of genetically susceptible breeds has been associated with transient seizures in puppies and adult dogs, as well as a variety of autoimmune diseases including those affecting the blood, endocrine organs, joints, skin and mucosa, central nervous system, eyes, muscles, liver, kidneys, and bowel. It is postulated that an underlying genetic predisposition to these conditions places other littermates and close relatives at increased risk.

Speakers
avatar for Jean Dodds

Jean Dodds

Hemopet
W. Jean Dodds, DVM graduated in 1964 from the Ontario Veterinary College, Canada. She has 5 decades of veterinary clinical and diagnostic research, over 150 publications, and membership in national and international committees. Hemopet, her non-profit national animal blood bank was... Read More →


Thursday May 17, 2018 3:00pm - 4:00pm
Plaza P2 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

3:30pm

Wool production without mulesing - a producer perspective
Speakers
avatar for Bruce Allworth

Bruce Allworth

Allworth Sheep and Cattle Production
Worked at Massey University and Melbourne University (Mackinnon Project). Operated Allworth Sheep and Cattle Consultancy Services for 25 years. Completed a pHD in footrot eradication, and coordinated the National Johnes Disease Program from 1997-2003. Operates sheep and cattle property... Read More →


Thursday May 17, 2018 3:30pm - 4:00pm
Plaza P3 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

4:30pm

MEMBER FORUM - with James O'Loghlin
Thursday May 17, 2018 4:30pm - 6:00pm
Great Hall Doors 1 and 8 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre
 
Friday, May 18
 

8:00am

Australian Veterinary Conservation Biology Field Trip “Wildlife Care and Treatment, Captive Breeding”
RSPCA Wacol, Hidden Vale Sanctuary, UQ Gatton, Veterinary Hospital & Food & Agriculture

Hosted by well-known Gold Coast Dreamworld Vet, Dr Vere Nicholson this fieldtrip will provide a complete day’s program visiting some of the major wildlife care and captive breeding centres in SE Queensland. We will visit RSPCA’s busy facility at Wacol en-route to Hidden Vale Sanctuary, a purpose build wildlife care and captive breeding facility. We will also hear of the wildlife postgraduate work being conducted at Hidden Vale by graduate students of UQ.  Lunch will be at the spectacular Spicers Lane where delegates can choose their own lunch options from simple to lavish. Then on to the University of Queensland campus at Gatton to inspect their Veterinary Hospital. This trip will provide the opportunity to meet key wildlife vets and carers as well as become acquainted with current practice and issues. With a full program and limited space best to book early.

Capacity:  15

AVA member:         $150
AVA student:             $75
Non-member:          $300

3 VetEd points

Friday May 18, 2018 8:00am - 5:00pm
Workshops & Field Trips

8:30am

Sheep, Camelid and Goat Veterinarians Field Trip to Goat Farms
Bus Tour of Darling Downs and Lockyer Valley Goat Farms

Caprine Arthritis Encephalitis eradication and biosecurity will be discussed with a large commercial Parmalat goat milk supplier. Internal parasite control will be discussed on a Boer goat property. Miniature goats and their health problems will also be covered. Non-catered but stops along the way to purchase food.

AVA member: $220
SIG member:  $200
AVA student/new graduate member: $100
Non-member: $440

VetEd points:   3.5

Friday May 18, 2018 8:30am - 5:30pm
Workshops & Field Trips

8:30am

Veterinary Business Group (VBG) Practice Management Exclusive Insights Tour
A behind-the-scenes tour of three small and mixed veterinary practices in Brisbane, providing unique insight into the running of a successful practice. The day will focus on vital areas, such as finance, management, marketing and branding, human resources, strategies and infrastructure. The day will include morning tea, lunch and afternoon tea, as well as transport between the practices.

AVA Member:          $699
Non-member:          $1,298

5.5 VetEd points

Friday May 18, 2018 8:30am - 5:30pm
Workshops & Field Trips

9:00am

Australian Veterinarian Behaviour Interest Group (AVBIG) - The Behaviour Case: From diagnosis to successful long-term management
Diagnosis of behaviour cases is just the first step in a lengthy process working towards reduced anxiety and normalised behaviour in our patients. The life of a behaviour cases are complex and rarely smooth. Join Dr Theresa De Porter, Dr Kersti Seksel and Dr Jacqui Ley to work through behaviour cases from start through several revisits to see how cases change and are managed.

AVA member: $200
SIG member:  $150
AVA student/new graduate member:    $100
Non-member: $400

VetEd points:   3

Friday May 18, 2018 9:00am - 12:00pm
Workshops & Field Trips

9:00am

Hands-on Urinalysis workshop
National Vet Care, Unit 1, 28 Burnside Road, Ormeau

Hosted by Hill's Pet Nutrition    
Hands on Urinalysis workshop with Dr Penny Dobson, BVSc, MACVSc (canine medicine) Hill's Pet Nutrition Australian Minnesota Urolith service veterinarian for 13 years will take you through the importance of urine analysis, emphasising the purpose of the test, normal values, and interpretation of results covering key areas on collection, physical, chemical and microscopic examination.
Urinalysis should be a mandatory diagnostic tool used to evaluate a patient’s health. It provides valuable information on a patient’s clinical condition and is a great screening tool for chronic disease. A complete urine analysis includes specific gravity, physical and chemical properties, microscopic sediment examination with culture / sensitivity testing. Unfortunately it is a much neglected facet in veterinary medicine. This wetlab is to provide you with the practical skills to take urine analysis to the ultimate level, allowing you to see more and how to interpret the results you find. Urinalysis is a safe, non-invasive simple study of urine which requires only urination on the part of the patient; it creates no discomfort, poses no health-related risks, has no direct side effects, and evinces no adverse responses. Urine analysis when performed properly is highly reliable and we need to include it as an extension of our bedside clinical assessment.

Bus depart 8.30 am bus  for 9.15am arrival time for  9.30 am start.

AVA/SIG member:  $50
Non-member:           $100

VetEd points:  2

Friday May 18, 2018 9:00am - 1:00pm
Workshops & Field Trips

9:00am

Australian Cattle Veterinarians (ACV) Bovine Basics from Gatton Gurus
University of Queensland Gatton Campus

Add our Friday workshop to your diary! Hop on a luxury coach and be chauffeured about for an extravaganza of bovine clinical skills revision at the various UQ facilities.  You will progress through a series of stations looking at such things as:
  • Lameness management 
  • Veterinary Bull Breeding Soundness Evaluation (BULLCHECK®)
  • Obstetrics
  • Basic Surgery techniques (eye ablations, teat surgery, claw amputation, uterine suturing)

AVA member:                                   $440
SIG member:                                     $330
AVA student/new graduate:    $200
Non-member                                    $880    

10 VetEd points  

Friday May 18, 2018 9:00am - 3:30pm
Workshops & Field Trips

9:00am

AVA Mental Health First Aid Training Workshop*
Plaza P8,  Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

Part 2 of our certified course that will enable you to identify and support someone who is experiencing a mental health crisis.

*This workshop forms part of the accredited blended learning MHFA course which comprises of 8 hours of e-learning – completion of the online component prior to this workshop is mandatory.
Please contact Monika Cole, AVA Recent Graduate and Student Program Manager, monika.cole@ava.com.au.

Complimentary for Part 2 participants.

6 VetEd points

Friday May 18, 2018 9:00am - 4:00pm
Workshops & Field Trips

9:00am

Equine Veterinarians Australia (EVA) – Pre Purchase Examination Workshop
Plaza P6, Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

Kindly supported by:


Presented by Dr Nathan Anthony  BVSc MANZCVSc and Dr Nick Kannegieter BVSc PhD FACVSc
An equine veterinarian needs to be fully competent in all aspects of performing the Pre-Purchase Examination. Be that in either the Sporthorse, Racehorse or the Juvenile, being able to communicate effectively with the Purchaser and Vendor; knowing how to report abnormal findings; pre-purchase medication screening; being able to assess the use of radiology, endoscopy and drug screening and very importantly, avoiding litigation from a disgruntled client are essential skills for the equine vet.

This workshop presents a fully guided and interactive, 5 Stage process to learn the required skills. EVA’s excellent Pre-Purchase Examination video will be used to cover all the aspects in a completely interactive process. With newly updated material for 2018 and presented by two former presidents of Equine Veterinarians Australia, this comprehensive one day Pre Purchase Examination workshop is a must for equine veterinarians and mixed practitioners alike. All delegates will receive a complimentary copy of the brand new edition of the ‘EVA Blue Book: A guide to the examination of the horse.’ The workshop is excellent value and attracts:

AVA member:                                                         $475
SIG member:                                                           $375
AVA student/new graduate member:       $200
Non-member:                                                          $950

11 VetEd points

Friday May 18, 2018 9:00am - 4:00pm
Workshops & Field Trips

9:00am

Unusual Pet and Avian Veterinarians (UPAV) Sea World Field Trip
Sea World, Seaworld Drive, Main Beach, Gold Coast

A behind the scenes tour of Sea World on the Gold Coast with resident veterinarian, David Blyde. The day includes bus transfers, lunch and entry into Sea World so you can explore the rest of the park. Bus departs BCEC at 9.00am sharp and departs from Sea World at 4.00pm.

AVA member/partner/guest:   $160
SIG member/partner/guest:     $120
Non-member:                                   $320

VetEd points:  1

Friday May 18, 2018 9:00am - 4:00pm
Workshops & Field Trips

9:00am

Integrative Vets Australia (IVA) "Chronic illness: conundrums and case studies"
Club Room, St Andrews Anglican Church 160 Vulture Street South Brisbane

With Dr Jean Dodds and Dr Barbara Fougere

Join us for a day of collegiate brain storming with two of the world’s foremost experts in integrative medicine. Your chance to ask the experts about managing those difficult chronic cases. Dr Dodds will lead us through a series of case studies, discussing history taking, diagnostic options, lab tests, and outcomes. Dr Fougere will then discuss the clinical application of adaptogens, as well as teaching us about phytotherapy for a variety of chronic illnesses including diabetes, thyroid disease and pancreatitis.

AVA member:                                                     $350
SIG member :                                                      $300
AVA student/new graduate member:   $250
Non-member:                                                      $700

6 VetEd points

Friday May 18, 2018 9:00am - 5:00pm
Workshops & Field Trips

9:30am

Veterinary Business Group (VBG) – Building world class veterinary teams – Alison Lambert
Plaza P9, Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

In this full-day interactive workshop, Alison Lambert will explore the principles and practicalities of building a great team. Your people drive the success of the practice, controlling Key Performance Indicators for the business and shaping the all-important customer experience - without an engaged and motivated team, the practice will flounder.
This Masterclass will share best practice from academia and case studies from real practices, helping you develop skills and confidence in a number of crucial areas:
  • Effective recruitment - find and keep people who fit the practice. 'Grow your own' through student placements and university internships, build positive recommendation as an employer of choice amongst the undergraduate community (your future colleagues).
  • Management and development - motivate and coach your team at every level (not just the vets), matching skills to roles and optimising communication.
  • Recognising when it's time to part company with colleagues whose ethos doesn't match the practice values, and managing appropriately.
Your practice is only ever as good as the weakest link in the team - this workshop will give you all the skills and insight you need to strengthen those links and bond the team together into a formidable force that will really give your practice the edge.

AVA member: $539
SIG member/partner/guest: $399
AVA student/new graduate member: $99
Non-member $1,078

VetEd points:   5.5

Friday May 18, 2018 9:30am - 4:00pm
Workshops & Field Trips

10:00am

Australian Veterinarians for Animal Welfare and Ethics (AVAWE) workshop “Changing human behaviour: Changing animal lives”
Plaza P7, Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

Join members of AVAWE as they explore, discuss and debate approaches to changing human behaviour to improve animal welfare. Strategies include engagement with the community, schoolchildren- the next generation of consumers, stock owners and handlers, shareholders, exporters and veterinarians making clinical decisions. Providing resources, knowledge, training or other means to improve animal welfare may be meaningless if there is not a corresponding change in behaviour and positive attitude towards animal care.

AVA member:         $150
SIG member:           $150
Student:                     $100
Non-member:         $300

6 VetEd points

Friday May 18, 2018 10:00am - 4:00pm
Workshops & Field Trips